Chronology-Central Asia and the Caucasus

The Middle East Journal, Autumn 2012 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Chronology-Central Asia and the Caucasus


See also Afghanistan, Iran, Pakistan

Apr. 19: A court in Khujand sentenced 34 men to jail terms of between eight and 28 years after they were found guilty of belonging to the banned Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan. Seventeen more men were later convicted of membership in the same organization and were given jail terms of between nine and 23 years. Some of the men reportedly admitted to some of the charges, and five of them allegedly attended militant training camps in Afghanistan and Pakistan. [RFE/RL, 4/19]

May 6: Armenian president Serzh Sarkisian's Republican Party won a majority of the country's 131-seat parliament. He received 44% of the vote under a party list system and a further 28 seats contested by individual candidates. The election was free of the violence that followed the country's 2008 presidential election but received a mixed assessment from international observers who criticized violations of campaign law. The Prosperous Armenia Party finished second, garnering about 30% of the vote. [Reuters, 5/7]

May 18: Turkmen president Gurbanguli Berdymukhammedov pardoned 1,000 prisoners in the second prison amnesty of the year. State-run media said they had "sincerely repented for their deeds." The amnesty came as Turkmenistan marked the anniversary of the adoption of its constitution. [RFE/RL, 5/18]

May 21: Azerbaijan recalled its ambassador to Iran following Iran's recall of its ambassador to Azerbaijan after a protest outside Iran's embassy in Baku. The moves heightened tensions further following Azerbaijan's purchase of Israeli-made weapons and Iran's alleged plotting of terrorist attacks in Azerbaijan. Previously, Azerbaijan arrested 22 Iranians in March who were accused of spying for Iran. [NYT, 5/22]

May 23: Turkmenistan's state-run Turkmengaz signed deals with Pakistan's Inter State Gas Systems and India's GAIL to sell and purchase natural gas. The deals depended on the construction of a pipeline which was to run through Afghanistan, spurring doubts about the feasibility of the project and raising security concerns.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Chronology-Central Asia and the Caucasus
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?