Effect of Learning Organization Perception to the Organizational Commitment: A Comparison between Private and Public University

By Balay, Refik | Kuram ve Uygulamada Egitim Bilimleri, Autumn 2012 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Effect of Learning Organization Perception to the Organizational Commitment: A Comparison between Private and Public University


Balay, Refik, Kuram ve Uygulamada Egitim Bilimleri


Abstract

This research aims to examine the impact of faculty members' learning organization perceptions to the organizational commitment through quantitative method. The study group consists of 172 faculty members working in two universities, which are private (Zirve University) and public (Harran University) ones. The research results show that faculty members working in private university have a higher level of learning organization perceptions than faculty members in public university and feel a higher level of commitment to universities which they work. Results also indicate that private university's faculty members' perceptions of learning organization dimensions with perceptions of levels of organizational commitment (except for commitment based on compliance), in all dimensions, were more positive than those working in public university. Also, the dimension of reinforced employees from learning organization dimensions negatively predicts organizational commitment based on compliance and the dimensions of team learning and shared systems positively predict the organizational commitment based on identification. Especially, the dimension of shared systems constitutes a more powerful effect on the commitment on the level of identification. Finally it was found that none of the learning organization dimensions made a significant impact on organizational commitment based on internalization.

Key Words

Learning Organization, Organizational Commitment, Private University, Public University, Faculty Members.

Learning Organizations

Organizations, not just people, must also adapt to rapidly changing circumstances. One of the management concepts developed to increase competitiveness and survival of organizations is the concept of learning organization. This concept is based on organizations to acquire new knowledge, to share the information produced and to use in solving the problems transforming the organization's information. In this sense, learning is an existential act which presents continuity for organizations. According to Richardson (1995), achieving effective learning by creating new markets, products, services, and processes to respond to changing environments has become the most strategic issue of recent years. So, how organizational learning will develop productivity and performance in rapidly changing and highly interactive business environment seems to preserve the distinction of being a strategic issue not only today but also in the future.

The tendency to see learning as a lifestyle for organizations, especially, started after Senge's works in the 1990s. Establishing learning organizations include training people looking with system thinking to events, developing your own personal expertise, thinking with mental models, having a shared vision and also learning through team and collaboration (Senge, 1993). On the other hand, researchers mention the existence of seven compulsory action turning organizations into learning organizations. These are creating opportunities for continuous learning, developing research and dialogue, encouraging collaboration and team work, establishing systems which provide information and share learning, integrating people around a common vision, making the organization associated with its environment, and finally establishing supportive leadership in both individual and team and organizational level (Cullen, 1999).

Scan of the learning organization idea emphasizes the definitions of different learning organizations. According to Hitt (1995), Giriego, Geroy, and Wright (2000) learning organization is an organization looking for transformation and excellence through interrupted and continuous organizational renewal and gradually mastering in this subject. To Gold (1997), Dunphy, Turner, and Crawford (1997), learning organization is to re-shape skills and the use and share in both individual and organizational level. Learning begins with being a member of the organization.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Effect of Learning Organization Perception to the Organizational Commitment: A Comparison between Private and Public University
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.