Defendant at Corrupting Morals Trial Testifies in Montreal: My Work Is Art

By Banerjee, Sidhartha | The Canadian Press, December 18, 2012 | Go to article overview

Defendant at Corrupting Morals Trial Testifies in Montreal: My Work Is Art


Banerjee, Sidhartha, The Canadian Press


My work is art, says man at corrupting-morals trial

--

MONTREAL - A Quebec special-effects expert on trial for corrupting morals defended himself and his gory work as art while testifying Tuesday in a Montreal courtroom.

Remy Couture testified in his own defence, telling a jury trial that the horror website he ran, Inner Depravity, which brought to life a psychopathic killer character of his own creation, is not the violent pornography the Crown makes it out to be.

The material in question includes hundreds of photos and a pair of videos that depict gruesome murders, torture, assaults and necrophilia -- all with young female victims appearing partially or completely nude.

The website that hosted his work came to the attention of law enforcement after an overseas complaint.

"My objective was to create horror, plan and simple," Couture, 35, said during a fifth day of testimony before the Quebec Superior Court.

Couture faces three counts of corrupting morals through the distribution, possession and production of obscene materials in a rare case that explores the boundaries of artistic expression and Canadian obscenity laws.

Under cross-examination by Crown prosecutor Michel Pennou, Couture denied that he'd created what resembled a "snuff film" and brushed off suggestions that he was creating violent pornography.

"I create horror. I'm not a pornographer," Couture told the jury.

"The goal is not to excite, it's to disgust."

Couture said he was inspired by horror films and literature he'd read and simply created a serial-killer character and a universe for him. He described the work as the "fake diary of a serial killer."

Couture said the sexual nature of some of the photos is secondary -- he referred to that as an "accessory." He said the special effects and artistic value are what he's most interested in.

The Crown describes the material on the site, not currently online, as obscene and says it goes too far. The prosecution says the work is dominated by sex and is criticizing the fact there was nothing to keep minors off the site.

The Inner Depravity website was popular enough that Couture had to switch to a U.S. server to handle the increase in traffic.

Couture told the jury that some people didn't believe the images were fake and would write to tell him so. He said he would send them the "making-of" images to prove it. …

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Defendant at Corrupting Morals Trial Testifies in Montreal: My Work Is Art
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