Editorial Exchange: Barack Obama Takes Aim at Weapons of War

By Star, Toronto | The Canadian Press, December 2, 2012 | Go to article overview

Editorial Exchange: Barack Obama Takes Aim at Weapons of War


Star, Toronto, The Canadian Press


Editorial Exchange: Barack Obama takes aim at weapons of war

--

An editorial from the Toronto Star, published Dec. 19:

They held services for Dawn Hochsprung and Victoria Soto on Wednesday, grieving the loss of two brave women who defied a mass murderer and his weapons of slaughter. Hochsprung was the principal at Sandy Hook Elementary School who boldly threw her 5-foot-2 frame at the gunman who had forced his way into the building. Soto was the heroic teacher who huddled over her kids, trying to shield them, amid a hail of bullets.

Americans are still in shock at the horror of this massacre of 20 first graders and six educators, one of the most searing incidents ever of gun violence. And, just maybe, they will be stirred to action.

In a daring and welcome move, U.S. President Barack Obama has vowed to launch his second term in office by pushing Congress to keep "weapons of war" off the streets, to curb the worst violence.

This bid to put the "safety" on at least some aspects of American gun culture will be an uphill battle, given the nation's passion for guns, the obtuse Republican obsession with them, a Constitution that enshrines the right to bear arms and a Supreme Court that has interpreted that right over broadly. But Obama's drive to improve health care was an uphill battle, too. Could there be a better legacy for a Nobel Peace Prize laureate, than curbing the scourge of gun violence that kills 30,000 a year by suicide, homicide or accident? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Editorial Exchange: Barack Obama Takes Aim at Weapons of War
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.