Have Your Say

Winnipeg Free Press, December 29, 2012 | Go to article overview

Have Your Say


Roots of courage

Of the 165 Conservative members of Parliament, is there not one who has the courage to cross the river from Parliament Hill to meet with Chief Theresa Spence on Victoria Island?

What about those Mennonite MPs (Toews, Bergen, Block, Fast, Hiebert) whose roots go back to the martyrs in the Martyrs' Mirror? I'll bet the pope and the cardinals and authorities during the Reformation thought those crazy Anabaptists were just grandstanding.

ARMIN WIEBE

Winnipeg

Open to technology

Your Dec. 22 story Internet no longer an un-Hutterite thing is at least 12 years late. I began teaching Hutterites online high school courses through the Internet in 2000. They were very open to technology then, even more than other groups.

Online learning is the best way to level the playing field for all students in a class. Perhaps the reason for this lack of coverage is that not all people need to announce to the world what they are doing. This apparent humility could certainly be spread to some others in our "look at me" society today.

PAUL DOYLE

Winnipeg

Minimum security

Re: No rush to lock doors, Manitoba school divisions say (Dec. 22). Manitoba Teachers' Society president Paul Olson says that because the killer in Newtown broke in through the window that locking doors is ineffective. Really? Does he not lock the doors to his own house, because, well, any intruder can break in through his windows?

Just because locking doors is not a panacea, does that mean it should not be done at all? At the very minimum, it would cut off a would-be intruder or assailant's first point of entry.

Make it as difficult as possible difficult for him to enter. Treat a school as you would your home, an airport, a seniors homes or apartments. Have a security system in place. Safety trumps inconvenience.

The subtext of Olson's message is that it won't happen in Winnipeg. Newtown has proven that wrong: It can happen anywhere.

DAVE KOCHAN

Winnipeg

ñü

The National Rifle Association appears totally out of touch with reality and completely self-absorbed. For such an organization to wield so much power and influence in Washington is far more scary than any gun-toting American with a mental-illness diagnosis.

VIC UNRUH

Winnipeg

Infallible hypocrisy

I continue to be amazed that anyone would pay attention to anything Pope Benedict XVI has to say (Pope blasts gay marriage, Dec. 22). Here is a man who didn't have the courage to resist Nazi ideology when he was young, and doesn't have the moral courage to deal with the real cause of the sexual abuse of thousands of young children during hundreds of years at the hands of the Catholic Church.

To add insult to injury to this worldwide obscenity, Pope Benedict has the audacity to tell us gay marriage is dangerous because "people dispute the idea that they have a nature, given to them by their bodily identity, that serves as a defining element of the human being."

The Pope is right; some people dispute the idea that humans have a nature. The Pope's intractable and disastrously misguided objection to priests being men, heterosexual or homosexual, with sexual needs underlies the Catholic Church's problem.

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