Flying Solo

By Schalk, Chris | The Agricultural Education Magazine, November/December 2012 | Go to article overview

Flying Solo


Schalk, Chris, The Agricultural Education Magazine


April 29, 2012 will be forever fixed in my memory. On that clear, calm Sunday afternoon my flight instructor climbed out of a Cessna 150, said "have a nice flight," and slammed the door. It was at that moment that I realized I was going to be flying solo. I taxied to the hold short line where I began to go through my preflight checklist. The checklist is to ensure that everything is in order prior to departure. After completing the checklist, I taxied onto the runway, smoothly added power and began my first solo flight.

Later that evening I was reflecting on my solo and the emotions that I felt. My mind drifted back to August 19, 1993 and a very similar situation; the door slammed and I realized I was about to solo with my first class. The emotions were similar both days. The fear and overflowing joy made my palms sweat and stomach churn. Instructors and supervisors were gone. It was just me and the task ahead. As I reflected, I realized the only difference in my two solo experiences was the preflight checklist. At that moment I began to ponder my experiences supervising student teachers. Was I doing them a disservice because I had not helped them develop their own preflight checklist?

Supervising student teachers is one aspect of my career that I truly love. It is the best of both worlds because they are students and teachers. They teach not only students, but if allowed, they can teach even the oldest dog new tricks. Student teachers have the tools but they need to be shown how to take those tools and turn out works of beauty and usefulness. Checklists will not make one a good pilot nor will they make a person a good teacher. Sound fundamentals, preparation, adaptability, and a positive attitude will take a person where they want to go. However, the checklist forces the learner to say, yes or no. "Am I ready to depart?" "Am I ready to teach this class?"

Checklists will also give the supervising teacher a rubric to evaluate the student teacher on their preparation for the lesson. Sure the lesson plan can be read, assessments looked over, and lab activities can be double checked. Yet, add in the checklist, the student teacher now has specific areas where improvements or refinements can be made. Remember, the answer to the checklist points can be either yes or no. There is no in between. The plane is either ready for takeoff or not. Would you want to fly on an airplane that is kinda ready!

Checklist

* Objectives for both the lesson and the day are prepare in SMART (specific-measurableattainable-realistic-timed) format

* Modification are in place so all students can be successful

* Classroom procedures laid out step by step

* Classroom is clean, and comfortable

* Lesson plan is clear, complete, and flexible

* Lesson provides elements of reading and writing

* Assessment is aligned to the objectives

* All materials are out and accessible

* Technology to be used is up and operational

* Enrichment activities are available in case lesson goes faster than anticipated

* Attitude is positive

If planning is complete, how long will this really take? Laminate the checklist on a card, and give it to the student teachers just like the checklist is in my airplane. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Flying Solo
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.