Today in History - Jan. 17

The Canadian Press, January 4, 2013 | Go to article overview

Today in History - Jan. 17


Today in History - Jan. 17

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Today in History for Jan. 17:

On this date:

In AD 356, Antony of Egypt, considered the founder of Christian monasticism, died at age 105.

In 1377, despite the protest of powerful French cardinals, Pope Gregory XI returned the Roman Catholic papacy to Rome after its 70-year stay in Avignon, in southern France.

In 1562, French Protestants were recognized under the Edict of St. Germain.

In 1604, James I of England appointed 54 scholars to produce a new translation of the Bible. They included Anglicans, Puritans, linguists, theologians, clergy and laymen. The translation, completed in 1611, became one of the most lasting and influential English translations.

In 1694, the Bishop of Quebec read a pastoral letter declaring it a sin to "witness corrupting and impure plays," referring to theatrical performances staged at Quebec City.

In 1706, American inventor-statesman Benjamin Franklin was born in Boston.

In 1712, British War Secretary Robert Walpole was sent to the Tower of London on charges of corruption.

In 1759, the Holy Roman Empire declared war on Prussia.

In 1773, Capt. James Cook's ship, "Resolution," was the first ship to cross the Antarctic Circle.

In 1821, a Mexican land grant to Moses Austin opened the American colonization of what is now Texas.

In 1871, Andrew S. Hallidie received a patent for a cable-car system that began service in San Francisco in 1873.

In 1874, the original Siamese twins, Chang and Eng Bunker, died at 63.

In 1876, the Supreme Court of Canada sat for the first time.

In 1893, Hawaii's monarchy was overthrown as a group of white businessmen and sugar planters forced Queen Liliuokalani to abdicate.

In 1899, American gangster Al Capone was born.

In 1910, Thomas Crapper, believed to be the main developer of the flush toilet mechanism, died at 72.

In 1917, the U.S. paid Denmark $25 million for the Virgin Islands.

In 1929, the "Popeye the Sailor" comic strip first appeared.

In 1945, Soviet and Polish forces liberated Warsaw during the Second World War.

In 1945, Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg, credited with saving tens of thousands of Jews from the Nazis, disappeared in Hungary while in Soviet custody. Moscow authorities admitted years later that he died in custody, but the circumstances remain a mystery. Wallenberg was the first person named an honorary citizen of Canada.

In 1946, the United Nations Security Council held its first meeting, in London.

In 1957, "HMCS Bonaventure," Canada's last aircraft carrier, was commissioned in Belfast.

In 1959, the federal state of Mali was formed in Africa by the union of Senegal and French Sudan.

In 1961, Canada returned Polish treasures that it had stored for safekeeping during the Second World War.

In 1961, Prime Minister John Diefenbaker and U.S. President Dwight Eisenhower signed the Columbia River Treaty in Washington. In return for building three dams (Duncan, Keenleyside and Mica) on the Columbia, Canada received half of the electricity generated and money for half of the flood protection the U.S. would receive over the life of the 60-year treaty. It was one of the last public appearances for Eisenhower prior to John Kennedy's inauguration three days later.

In 1966, an American B-52 bomber carrying four unarmed hydrogen bombs collided with a tanker plane off eastern Spain. Three of the bombs landed on dry land and were collected within 48 hours. The fourth was discovered two months later in the ocean.

In 1972, Canadian air traffic controllers went on strike, grounding most commercial flights. The walkout lasted 10 days.

In 1973, Ferdinand Marcos declared himself Philippine president for life. He fled the country in February, 1986, after "winning" a rigged election that eventually saw Corazon Aquino sworn in as president. Marcos died in 1989 while in exile in Hawaii. …

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