Specialization Is Pharmacy's Future

By Gates, Ernest P. | Drug Topics, January 2013 | Go to article overview

Specialization Is Pharmacy's Future


Gates, Ernest P., Drug Topics


DISPENSED AS WRITTEN

The future of pharmacy - a healthcare profession in which the role in patient treatment and care is continually growing - is specialization. It is pharmacy specialization that will enable our healthcare system to meet the mandate of controlling cost by improving medical outcomes. This will be accomplished through the provision of more care in community settings, as well as by reducing unnecessary hospital readmissions.

We are already seeing it happen. Where, once, all pharmacy services were provided in one place, specialty pharmacies are currently operating in areas such as oncology, geriatrics, diabetes, fertility, HIV, psychiatry, nuclear medicine, nutrition support, the compounding of specialty medications, and pharmacotherapy Various pharmacy specialty certifications are granted through organizations such as the American Pharmacists Association, the Board of Pharmacy Specialties, the American Society of Health- System Pharmacists, and the American College of Clinical Pharmacy.

I never envisioned the degree of specialization that exists today when I converted my retail pharmacy to one of the nation's first women's health and fertility pharmacies in 1982. At that time, specialty pharmacy was considered to be on the periphery of pharmacy, in much the same way that some consider alternative medicine to be on the periphery of the medical field.

The current trend toward pharmacy specialization is rooted in many factors. Chief among them is that pharmacy students today receive more clinical training than ever before. The six-year PharmD program includes many more hours of clinical medication management than did the shorter programs. Residency and fellowship requirements for pharmacists have also become increasingly stringent and demanding.

Also supporting the drive toward specialization is the heightened role of the pharmacist as a collaborator on the patient care team. The nation is confronted with a shortage of primary care physicians, and this has led to the elevation of other members of the care team, including nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and pharmacists. As pharmacists become more involved in evaluating a patient's therapeutic options, they will need to possess expertise in a broad array of different areas.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Specialization Is Pharmacy's Future
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.