American Technologies Network Corporation

Army, February 2013 | Go to article overview
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American Technologies Network Corporation


Corporate Structure - Founded 1995. CEO/President: Mark Vayn. COO: James Munn. CTO: Scott Henry. VP of Sales: Lowell Stacy. Number of Employees: 40. Headquarters: 1341 San Mateo Avenue, South San Francisco, CA 94080. Telephone: 1-800-91 02862. Website: www.atncorp.com.

American Technologies Network Corporation (ATN) is a leading manufacturer of precision electro-optics, including night vision and thermal imaging. Headquartered in a new, larger manufacturing and distribution facility in South San Francisco, Calif., ATN has been expanding its manufacturing and research and development to provide customers with faster delivery, greater quality assurance and a larger, more knowledgeable customer service staff.

Since 1995, ATN has been a global leader in high-performance, day and night precision optics, providing military, law enforcement and civilian markets with a variety of optics featuring proprietary technologies and night vision core technologies from producers such as FLIR Systems, Photonis, L-3 and ITT Night Vision.

The U.S. Army ground forces have been using the ATN PVS14-3 Night Vision Monocular and the ATN PVS7 Night Vision Goggles for low-light to no-light environments for surveillance, target acquisition and reconnaissance missions for several years. Both systems allow the soldier to determine whether the optic is handheld or helmet-mounted. The ATN PVS units, designed specifically for the military, have been combat proven in the most extreme environments.

As military requirements for better imaging information from the battlefield increase, companies like ATN have innovated new technologies for greater clarity and depth in a smaller, lighter and more durable package. Thermal imaging provides soldiers with better resolution and target definition. As part of the latest efforts to provide individual soldiers with thermal imaging products specific to their needs, ATN has launched the Tactical Thermal line of systems made in the United States. The new products are all multipurpose systems using the latest in miniature thermal sensor technology combined with the new organic lightemitting diode display, providing a superior stable image in the smallest package available.

Thermal imaging systems were first developed for use by the military in the 1950s. Thermal imaging devices allowed ground forces to see and identify targets through the thermal energy that is emitted off the target. Thermal imaging devices produce an image based on the temperature differences between objects, thus producing a clearer image of the target at long distances, through a variety of light to no-light conditions and through smoke, fog and rain.

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