LIS Students' Perceptions toward the Assimilation of E-Books in the Library: An Exploratory Analysis

By Aharony, Noa | Journal of Education for Library and Information Science, Winter 2013 | Go to article overview

LIS Students' Perceptions toward the Assimilation of E-Books in the Library: An Exploratory Analysis


Aharony, Noa, Journal of Education for Library and Information Science


The present study explores LIS students' perceptions toward the assimilation of e-books in the library. The research was conducted during the summer semester of the 2010 academic year in Israel and 144 students participated in the research. The study used three questionnaires: a personal details questionnaire, students' perceptions towards e-books assimilation in the library, and a cognitive appraisal questionnaire. The main findings suggest that LIS students have positive perceptions regarding the assimilation of e-books in the library. They are aware of the change and possible effect it may have on library collections, budget, and policy. Those students who have higher perceptions towards the assimilation of e-books in the library are more challenged by this phenomenon. Older students feel challenged to experience, learn and assimilate e-books more than younger students. This study highlights LIS students' perceptions towards e-books and is relevant for librarians, information scientists and LIS educators, helping them better understand, assimilate and explore the phenomenon of e-books in libraries.

Keywords: e-books, LIS students' perceptions, exploratory analysis

Introduction: e-books

Historians of the electronic book track its origins back to Vannevar Bush's concept of the Memex. They claim that Andries van Dam coined the term "Electronic Book" in 1967 as he was working with his students on the Hypertext Editing System (HEP), which enabled text to be read on a computer screen (Ardito, 2000). In 1968, Alan Kay presented the Dynabook device, which was similar to a laptop computer with a graphical user interface. In 1971, Project Gutenberg was launched to provide access to public domain titles freely available on the Internet. In 1996, Brewster Kahle founded the Internet Archive, a non-profit organization intended to preserve web pages and other content to prevent the internet from "disappearing."

In the late 1990's when Internet use became popular, some publishers and vendors considered hosting and selling ebooks. In 1999, NetLibrary offered more than 2,000 e-books to libraries, and in 2000 and 2001 Questia and ebrary entered the marketplace with various access models. In 2004 two new e-book providers, E-book Library (EBL) and MyiLibrary, were launched, followed by Google's announcement of its Print Library Project in cooperation with the New York Public Library, the University of Michigan, Harvard, Oxford, and Stanford. This project allows searching digitized collections from those libraries using Google Book Search. Users can view and download entire books no longer protected by copyright, and can view information about and access limited portions of digitized books still under copyright. Different publishers, such as Elsevier, Oxford University Press, Springer, and Taylor & Francis, developed in-house e-book publishing enterprises that provided them the opportunity to host and sell e-books directly to libraries (Connaway & Wicht, 2007).

Problem Statement

As the e-book phenomenon becomes more widespread in our information world, it is worth examining its presence in the library landscape. Various studies have focused on e-books in general and the impact of e-books on the academy, but this study presents an as-yet-unexplored dimension: LIS students' perceptions on the assimilation of e-books in libraries. The current study refers to the e-books definition in an inclusive way and aims to explore whether LIS students are familiar with these new technological innovations. Do they understand the power of e-books? Are they ready to adopt new applications in the library?

The three primary research questions are:

1. How do LIS students perceive the assimilation of e-books in the libraries?

2. Are students' perceptions towards the assimilation of e-books in the libraries influenced by their personality characteristic of cognitive appraisal [where cognitive appraisal refers to the individual's evaluation of the significance of events on his or her well-being, and the individual's efforts in coping in thought and action to manage specific demands]? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

LIS Students' Perceptions toward the Assimilation of E-Books in the Library: An Exploratory Analysis
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.