Al-Qaeda in the Heart of Africa

By Buchanan, Patrick J. | Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, March 2013 | Go to article overview

Al-Qaeda in the Heart of Africa


Buchanan, Patrick J., Washington Report on Middle East Affairs


"For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction" is Newton's third law of physics.

Its counterpart in geopolitics is "blowback," when military action in one sphere produces an unintended and undesirable consequence in another.

Sept. 11, 2001 was blowback.

George H.W. Bush had sent an army of half a million to hurl Saddam Hussain out of Kuwait, a triumph. He proceeded to impose severe sanctions on the Iraqis and to build U.S. bases in Saudi Arabia.

"Infidel" soldiers on sacred Islamic soil and the suffering of the Iraqi people under American sanctions were two of the causes Osama bin Laden listed in his declaration of war on the United States.

Our 3,000 dead on 9/11 were blowback for having established a neo-imperial presence in the Arabian Peninsula after Desert Storm.

In the African nation of Mali today, where al-Qaeda and allies have seized the northern half of the country, Azawad, as large as Texas, we are witnessing blowback for President Barack Obama's intervention in Libya.

How so? Due almost entirely to U.S.-backed NATO bombing, which prevented Muammar Qaddafifrom crushing the uprising of 2011, the colonel was overthrown and murdered by rebels.

Tuaregs from Mali, whom Qaddafihad brought into his army, fled or were expelled from Libya. Taking their heavy weapons, they returned to a country where their people had been mistreated and seized its northern half, to secede and create their own nation.

But the jihadists who fought alongside them to capture the north turned on them and drove them from power. Ansar Dine and al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM)-like the Taliban in Afghanistan who blew up the ancient Bamiyan Buddhas-then blew up all non-Islamic shrines and imposed a brutal form of shariah law. Adulterers are subject to stonings. Thieves have their hands amputated.

This is but part of the strategic disaster, however. The U.S.-trained Malian army collapsed in the face of the rebellion. U.S.-trained Malian troops defected to the jihadists. A Malian captain trained at Ft. Benning overthrew the democratic government in Bamako and seized power.

This situation had festered for 10 months. Then, in January, the jihadists occupied Konna and threatened Mopti, south of the dividing line, and Islamists entering Mali from Mauritania seized Diabaly, only 250 miles from Bamako. The whole of Mali seemed about to fall to al-Qaeda.

France, whose colony Mali was, reacted.

In Mali today, we are witnessing blowback for President Obama's intervention in Libya.

President François Hollande sent planes to bomb the Islamists and 2,500 French soldiers to recapture Diabaly. …

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