Three Messages and a Warning: Contemporary Mexican Short Stories of the Fantastic

By Morrison, Michael A. | World Literature Today, May/June 2012 | Go to article overview

Three Messages and a Warning: Contemporary Mexican Short Stories of the Fantastic


Morrison, Michael A., World Literature Today


Three Messages and a Warning: Contemporary Mexican Short Stories of the Fantastic. Eduardo Jiménez Mayo & Chris N. Brown, eds. Easthampton, Mass. Small Beer Press. 2011. isbn 9781931520317

Since the publication in 1912 of its first tale of the fantastic, "La cena" by Alfonso Reyes, Mexican fiction has been enriched by hundreds of increasingly sophisticated tales in this mode. Almost all of these stories have remained untranslated into English, until now. So bravo, Small Beer Press and editors Mayo and Brown, for bringing us Three Messages and a Warning, a landmark collection of the Mexican fantastic.

To sample the flavor of this collection, let's try out a few entrées. Opening the book almost at random, we light upon Donají Olmedo's "The Stone," a vignette narrated by an oak tree in which "you" and "you's" erstwhile lover, Francisco, apparently turn to stone. Nearby we find Guillermo Samperio's "Mr. Strogoff," a single, three-page-long sentence fragment constructed from rumors about possible vengeance from beyond the grave. Then "Mannequin," a harrowing poem by Esther M. Garcia. Other fare include Alberto Chimal's "Variation on a Theme of Coleridge," an irresolute encounter between a man and himself as he was a year previously; the unforgettable "Wolves" by José Luis Zárate, in which a "blizzard of wolves, thousands, millions" inexplicably descend from the mountains and transform forever the inhabitants of a village in their path; and Carmen Rioja's "The Nahual Offering," a veritable maze of overlapping dreams that manipulate time to devastating effect by juxtaposing an ancient ritual against the depredations wrought by urbanization.

This sampler suffices to indicate the main features of this collection. First, its contents are "stories" only in the loosest sense of the word. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Three Messages and a Warning: Contemporary Mexican Short Stories of the Fantastic
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.