Economic Census 2002 Features Many 'Firsts'

The CPA Journal, February 2003 | Go to article overview

Economic Census 2002 Features Many 'Firsts'


the U.S. Commerce Department's Census Bureau mailed millions of 2002 Economic Census forms in December to capture new information on U.S. businesses.

Next to the decennial census of population and housing, the Economic Census is the biggest project carried out by the Census Bureau. Twice each decade it compiles a complete profile of the U.S. economy, from the national to the local.

E-commerce. The Census Bureau is gathering the first information on the e-commerce sales of practically every industry in the United States. E-commerce includes sales, receipts, or revenue from any transaction completed over the Internet, extranets, electronic data interchange (EDI) networks, e-mail, or any other online system.

Leased employees. The 2002 Economic Census will collect information on the use of leased employees at all business establishments, rather than just permanent employees. Leased employees are those whose payroll taxes are filed with the IRS by an employee leasing company, not by the company where the work is performed.

Supply chain. The 2002 Economic Census will yield data on supply-chain relationships among those who manufacture goods, those who store and distribute goods, those who transport goods, and those who sell and bill for goods. Questions will identify whether certain functions are outsourced to other companies.

New industries and product classifications. The 2002 Economic Census completes work started in 1997 when the North American Industry Classifica-tion System (NAILS) was first implemented to replace the old Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAILS 2002 includes substantial revisions for the construction and wholesale trade sectors, as well as selected changes in the information and retail trade sectors.

NAPCS 2002. Starting with the 2002 Economic Census, product lines in four service sectors will for the first time be classified consistent with a new international agreement with Canada and Mexico, as the first phase in implementing the new North American Product Classification System (NAPCS). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Economic Census 2002 Features Many 'Firsts'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.