Two African American Women Who Spearheaded Early AAFCS Accreditation in Historically Black Colleges and Universities

By Smith, Bettye P. | Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences, Spring 1998 | Go to article overview

Two African American Women Who Spearheaded Early AAFCS Accreditation in Historically Black Colleges and Universities


Smith, Bettye P., Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences


Abstract: There is a void in the literature concerning African American women and their contributions to the Family and Consumer Sciences profession. This article is an attempt to provide information about the efforts and involvement of two African American women-Drs. Flossie Byrd and Eula Masingale-both deans of Family and Consumer Sciences who worked to obtain AAFCS accreditation for their programs in historically Black colleges and universities. These two individuals were selected because of their pioneering efforts and the quality of leadership given to the development of the accreditation process and to their own programs.

The career patterns of African American women in Family and Consumer Sciences programs and the positions they have held in the American Association oz family ana Consumer Sciences (AAFCS) are both indicative of their involvement and contributions to the profession. Two such women who took leadership positions at their own colleges and in their profession serve to illustrate an important force in undergraduate education programs in Family and Consumer Sciences.

African American women in Family and Consumer Sciences have become department heads, directors, and deans of units in Black institutions as well as in predominantly White institutions. Some have moved into university-wide administrative positions such as vice president and provost. Yet, the literature is meager regarding the involvement and contributions of African American women in the American educational system. Some African American female educators are mentioned in Afro-American history sources (Collier-Thomas, 1982) or in special issues of journals and books devoted to minorities such as the 1982 Summer Yearbook of The Journal of Negro Education (Collier-Thomas, 1982), the 1988 Yearbook of Home Economics Teacher Education (Williams, 1988), and the 1995 Summer issue of Innovative Higher Education (Atwater, 1995).

According to Ralston (1996), many African American women have served as pioneers in the development of Family and Consumer Sciences in higher education, but few attempts have been made to tell their stories. Therefore, this article seeks to tell the story of two such contemporary women at historically Black colleges and universities: Dr. Flossie Byrd, appointed dean in 1964 at Prairie View A&M in Prairie View, Texas, and Dr. Eula Masingale, appointed dean in 1976 at Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Byrd and Masingale are leaders who have risen through the university ranks to become deans of Family and Consumer Sciences units. While others have held similar administrative posts, the uniqueness of the contributions of these two women lies in their decision to promote quality in their units by subscribing to and receiving AAFCS accreditation. Among the Family and Consumer Sciences units in historically Black colleges and universities that have been accredited, units at Prairie View A&M, guided by Byrd, and Southern University, led by Masingale, were accredited second and fifth, respectively. In addition, Masingale led Alcorn State University in Lorman, Mississippi, through AAFCS accreditation.

Methodology and Context

The document analysis approach was used to develop this article. Data were gathered from personal vitae, articles printed in daily newspapers in the participants' community, bulletins and newsletters from the participants' universities, and letters of recommendations included with the personal vitae material. Archives at Prairie View A&M University and Southern University were used for informational purposes.

The question guiding this research was: What roles did these women, Drs. Flossie Byrd and Eula Masingale, have in contributing to Family and Consumer Sciences units and to AAFCS accreditation of Family and Consumer Sciences units in historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs)?

To establish the framework for this article, a brief overview of the history and development of AAFCS accreditation will be presented (see Table 1). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Two African American Women Who Spearheaded Early AAFCS Accreditation in Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.