Sodium Levels in Canadian Fast-Food and Sit-Down Restaurants

By Scourboutakos, Mary J.; L'Abbé, Mary R. | Canadian Journal of Public Health, January/February 2013 | Go to article overview

Sodium Levels in Canadian Fast-Food and Sit-Down Restaurants


Scourboutakos, Mary J., L'Abbé, Mary R., Canadian Journal of Public Health


ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the sodium levels in Canadian restaurant and fast-food chain menu items.

METHODS: Nutrition information was collected from the websites of major sit-down (n=20) and fast-food (n=65) restaurants across Canada in 2010 and a database was constructed. Four thousand and forty-four meal items, baked goods, side dishes and children's items were analyzed. Sodium levels were compared to the recommended adequate intake level (AI), tolerable upper intake level (UL) and the US National Sodium Reduction Initiative (NSRI) targets.

RESULTS: On average, individual sit-down restaurant menu items contained 1455 mg sodium/serving (or 97% of the AI level of 1500 mg/day). Forty percent of all sit-down restaurant items exceeded the AI for sodium and more than 22% of sit-down restaurant stir fry entrées, sandwiches/wraps, ribs, and pasta entrées with meat/seafood exceeded the daily UL for sodium (2300 mg). Fast-food restaurant meal items contained, on average, 1011 mg sodium (68% of the daily AI), while side dishes (from sit-down and fast-food restaurants) contained 736 mg (49%). Children's meal items contained, on average, 790 mg/serving (66% of the sodium AI for children of 1200 mg/day); a small number of children's items exceeded the children's daily UL. On average, 52% of establishments exceeded the 2012 NSRI density targets and 69% exceeded the 2014 targets.

CONCLUSION: The sodium content in Canadian restaurant foods is alarmingly high. A population-wide sodium reduction strategy needs to address the high levels of sodium in restaurant foods.

KEY WORDS: Sodium; restaurants; fast foods; Canada

La traduction du résumé se trouve à la fin de l'article. Can J Public Health 2013;104(1):e2-e8.

RÉSUMÉ

OBJECTIF : Évaluer les niveaux de sodium au menu des restaurants et des chaÎnes de restaurants rapides au Canada.

MÉTHODE : Nous avons recueilli en 2010 des données nutritionnelles sur les sites Web de restaurants assis (n=20) et de restaurants rapides (n=65) très fréquentés au Canada et construit une base de données. Quatre mille quarante-quatre mets, produits de boulangerie, plats d'accompagnement et mets pour enfants ont été analysés. Nous avons comparé les niveaux de sodium à l'apport suffisant (AS) recommandé, à l'apport maximal tolérable (AMT) et aux cibles de l'initiative nationale de réduction du sodium des États-Unis (NSRI).

RÉSULTATS : En moyenne, les articles au menu des restaurants assis contenaient 1 455 mg de sodium/portion (soit 97 % de l'AS de 1 500 mg/jour). Quarante p. cent des articles au menu des restaurants assis dépassaient l'AS en sodium, et plus de 22 % des plats sautés, des sandwiches ou roulés, des plats de côtes et des plats de pâtes avec viande ou poisson et fruits de mer servis dans les restaurants assis dépassaient l'AMT quotidien en sodium (2 300 mg). Les mets des restaurants rapides contenaient en moyenne 1 011 mg de sodium (68 % de l'AS quotidien), tandis que les plats d'accompagnement (des restaurants assis et rapides) en contenaient 736 mg (49 %). Les mets pour enfants contenaient en moyenne 790 mg/portion (66 % de l'AS en sodium de 1 200 mg/jour recommandé pour les enfants); un petit nombre de mets pour enfants dépassait l'AMT quotidien pour les enfants. En moyenne, 52 % des établissements dépassaient les cibles de densité de la NSRI pour 2012, et 69 % dépassaient les cibles pour 2014.

CONCLUSION : La teneur en sodium des aliments dans les restaurants canadiens est extrêmement élevée. Il faudrait une stratégie de réduction du sodium à l'échelle de la population pour s'attaquer aux niveaux élevés de sodium dans les aliments des restaurants.

MOTS CLÉS : sodium; restaurants; aliments de restauration rapide; Canada

High dietary sodium intake, a causal risk factor for hypertension, 1 is the leading preventable risk factor for death worldwide. 2 Sixty-two percent of strokes and 49% of coronary heart disease are attributed to hypertension. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Sodium Levels in Canadian Fast-Food and Sit-Down Restaurants
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.