Twentieth-Century Music and Politics [Essays in Memory of Neil Edmunds]

By Matthew-Walker, Robert | Musical Opinion, May/June 2013 | Go to article overview

Twentieth-Century Music and Politics [Essays in Memory of Neil Edmunds]


Matthew-Walker, Robert, Musical Opinion


Recent Books on Music - 2 Twentieth-Century Music and Politics [essays in memory of Neil Edmunds] Edited by Pauline Fairclough Ashgate Publishing 292pp hardback £65 ISBN 978-1-4094-0026-4

This is all right so far as it goes, but the title implies a far greater, more numerous, series of studies more widely cast than the fifteen varied contributions on offer here, most of which - although one occasionally encounters essays on music from outside Eastern Europe - reveal that the weighting is such that a newcomer to the subject might very well feel that the main places of such interest during the last century were east and north of the Danube (understandably, given that Pauline Fairclough's main areas of interest would appear to be Shostakovich and Soviet Music).

For example, there is nothing in this book discussing politics and music in the United States - the 'New Deal' composers (I assume I do not have to list them) are completely ignored, and those subsequently embarrassing works (by no means embarrassing musically) written in honour of the Soviet Union during World War II by American composers are likewise nowhere to be encountered. The impact of McCarthyism on music (Copland and Bernstein especially) is also ignored, and when one comes a little more closer to home, the heroic nature of (for example) much Norwegian and French music in World War II (during the Nazi occupations of both countries) is also totally absent.

Going further back, to World War I, there is nothing on German music of the period (from the other side, so to speak, most notably Reger's Opus 145 Organ pieces - a musical answer to Elgar's 'War Music'), and it is not strictly true to say that German music was virtually embargoed in Britain during 1914-18 (although very much of it was), for in the Monthly Musical Record 'for May 191 5, we read that, regarding Korngold's piano music, 'the Second Sonata ... is a splendid work, whilst the seven Märchenbilder Opus 3 are great favourites, especially the 'Princess in Disguise'. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Twentieth-Century Music and Politics [Essays in Memory of Neil Edmunds]
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.