Memorial: Paul Edgar Best

Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society, March 1998 | Go to article overview

Memorial: Paul Edgar Best


PAUL EDGAR BEST

Paul Edgar Best was born in Whittier, California, on December 4, 1928. As a child he suffered a near fatal illness. He was an active member of the Whittier Church of the Nazarene. Upon graduation with honors from Whittier Union High School in 1946 Paul entered Pasadena College, studying religion and philosophy in preparation for the pastoral ministry he felt God leading him to. Paul was a good singer and toured with The Crusaders Quartet, a foretaste of God's desire to use his musical abilities in later ministry. During college days Paul met Marjorie Earlene Highley. After a year's courtship they were married on December 11, 1948, at the Chapel of Roses in Pasadena. The Crusaders Quartet served as Paul's groomsmen.

Paul graduated from Pasadena College (now Point Loma Nazarene University in San Diego) in 1950 with high honors. He then pursued graduate studies in religion at Pasadena College while serving as minister of music for the Hawthorne and Bellflower Nazarene congregations. Two sons were born during these early days of ministry: David Michael in 1950, and Dale Warren in 1952. Robin Elizabeth completed their quiver two years later.

Paul enrolled at Nazarene Theological Seminary in Kansas City in 1952 but soon had to postpone his studies to return to southern California to care for his growing family and his aging parents. He briefly pastored the Spring Valley Church of the Nazarene before taking graduate courses in business and accounting, which led to owning and operating a bookkeeping business in Monrovia. Paul returned to fulltime pastoring in Thousand Oaks in 1967. Later he took an associate position in Lompoc. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Memorial: Paul Edgar Best
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.