Years in the Making, Controversial New Psychiatry 'Bible' about to Launch

By Branswell, Helen | The Canadian Press, May 13, 2013 | Go to article overview

Years in the Making, Controversial New Psychiatry 'Bible' about to Launch


Branswell, Helen, The Canadian Press


Controversial new psychiatry bible to be released

--

TORONTO, Cananda - It took more than a decade to write. Hundreds of mental health experts contributed to the laborious process. And still, before the first spine has been cracked on the latest iteration of the bible of psychiatry, the new DSM-5 has caused quite a stir.

Critics contend the newest version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders risks creating diagnosis-creep, with broader definitions that will encompass more people and medicalize things such as normal grieving.

Some have suggested the new reference manual will create false epidemics, with many more children and adults being diagnosed with mental health disorders for which they may be offered powerful drugs.

The Society for Humanistic Psychology is among those complaining about changes in the DSM-5. It argues in particular with the lowering of some diagnostic thresholds, such as the reduction in the number of criteria needed to receive a diagnosis of attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Brent Robbins is president-elect of the Society for Humanistic Psychology and co-chairs the organization's DSM-5 response committee. Robbins points to the DSM-5's elimination of what is known as the bereavement exclusion as another place where the new criteria may end up drawing in people who shouldn't really receive a mental health diagnosis.

In the DSM-IV, a person grieving the death of a loved one could not be diagnosed with major depression in the first two months after that loss. The new manual drops that waiting period, arguing that bereavement can trigger a major depressive episode and people suffering in this way should not have to wait for care.

But Robbins says the change means people coping with normal grief could end up with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder that would stay in their medical records for a lifetime.

"We would essentially take somebody who is going through a normal, transient human experience and say that they have a mental disease," says Robbins, an associate professor of psychology at Point Park University in Pittsburgh, Penn.

But the physician-in-chief at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) in Toronto says the claims that psychiatry will draw in multitudes of new cases are unfounded.

"We are not in the business of walking through schools and trying to find a client that we don't need so that the wait lists at CAMH for child psychiatry go from ... three months to now six months or from six months to 12 months," says Dr. Benoit Mulsant.

Mulsant suggests the aim of the new publication is to right some wrongs in the previous version of the DSM and to help people who are hurting from mental health disorders.

The DSM is produced by the American Psychiatric Association, and will be released by the organization at its annual meeting this weekend in San Francisco.

This is the first full revision of the manual since the DSM-IV was released in 1994. Much has been learned in that time and the new edition will reflect the evolving science. And yet, something that hasn't changed is perhaps at the root of much of the arguing that has gone on about the new reference manual.

Unlike cancer or diabetes, which can be confirmed by studying the results of a biopsy or the readings of a blood test, mental health disorders are still diagnosed by symptoms.

There is no blood test that can distinguish transient attacks of the blues from depression, no imaging technology that differentiates normal high-spiritedness from ADHD.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Years in the Making, Controversial New Psychiatry 'Bible' about to Launch
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.