Letters


The Crisis welcomes reader reactions and encourages expressions of opinion. Letters should be brief and may be edited for purposes of space or clarity. Letters should include writer's full name and addres. Write to:The Crisis, 4805 Mt Hope Drive, Baltimore, MD 212IS. Williams Was Timely

I have just finished reading The Crisis, dated December/January 1998. I found the story of Robert F.Williams, both moving and well-done. For a moment, it transported me to a time that most of us sometimes tend to forget.A time when to simply survive, one was forced to go out of one's way to avoid conflict and insults.A time when it was easier to pretend not to have heard or to have seen.A time when one's existence was ruled by fear

There are other Robert F Williamses out there. Many of them are lesser known. It would be quite wonderful if, from time to time, you would run a story of some of them, to jog our memories or perhaps to simply make us aware of their stories and lives. We need to know the names and see the faces, of those to whom we are so deeply indebted.

Ralph B. Solomon

Ormond Beach, Fla.

The article on Robert E Williams is timely I admire his courage,and I did then. But I also understand why the NAACP leadership had to oppose Williams. This was before the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and 1965. Martin Luther King Jr knew that nonviolence was the only effective strategy. His Aug. 28, 1963, speech was superb politics. Within a year Congress passed the Civil Rights Act.

In the past seven years many Americans have said that the six-week occupation of Tiananmen Square showed how oppressive the Chinese government is, when it was ended by troops.What these Americans conveniently forgot is that if the 1963 March on Washington had degenerated into a six-week standoff in front of the Lincoln Memorial, there would have been a blood bath many times greater that the few hundred deaths in the streets of Beijing.

Warren Himmelberger

Littleton, Mass.

Ruffins' Love Message

I feel I must write on behalf of Paul Ruffins' article on "Love, Marriage and Equality:AValentine to My Black Sisters:' What a powerful message that article brings to all of us, especially to our beautiful black sisters all over the world.That article was as good as the Valentine's card my wonderful husband of 44 years gave to me. …

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