From Where I Sit - Art of the Matter: News

By Bing, Hong | The Times Higher Education Supplement : THE, March 28, 2013 | Go to article overview

From Where I Sit - Art of the Matter: News


Bing, Hong, The Times Higher Education Supplement : THE


"It is parents' sorry lot to ensure the well-being of their children." This is a household saying in China, typically put into practice by the tens of thousands who accompany their kids to art examinations (yi kao) in the icy winds of early spring.

Nowadays, huge numbers of parents seem to be encouraging their offspring to take art exams and to major in such subjects so that they might gain an advantage in China's cut-throat national university entrance exams, the gao kao. The tactic makes sense, on the surface at least: the nation's colleges set significantly lower admission scores for art subjects in all their forms (performing arts, painting, animation and so on).

Students in their third year of secondary school can choose to take art exams arranged by various colleges, which are usually held between February and March (much earlier than the gao kao, sat in June). Applicants are evaluated by tests in separate art and culture sections, the latter of which include Chinese language and other subjects common to the national exams.

There is no escaping their date with destiny: after sitting yi kao, students still have to take the national exams. However, there are potential advantages to following the art route: those who do exceptionally well in the art-specific section enjoy privileges and may be admitted even if their grades fail to meet the standards demanded by the China-wide entrance tests.

This could explain why one sees so many children these days practising their piano-playing or singing without enthusiasm. It is also why at this time of year local and national media outlets churn out bucketloads of statistics and news analysis of art exams, complemented by human interest stories and appealing pictures of students and parents. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

From Where I Sit - Art of the Matter: News
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.