Arthur Miller: A Descriptive Bibliography

By Hackman, Timothy | Style, Spring 2013 | Go to article overview

Arthur Miller: A Descriptive Bibliography


Hackman, Timothy, Style


George W. Crandell. Arthur Miller: A Descriptive Bibliography. New Castle, DE: Oak Knoll Press, 2011. xii, 244pp & 1 CD-ROM. $195.

To misquote Ben Loman in Death of a Salesman, the jungle of bibliographic scholarship is dark but full of diamonds. If the intrepid scholar can avoid becoming ensnared in the undergrowth of variant editions or being mauled by misprinted citations, she may return with a rare item of value, a gem that illuminates previouslyunknown facets of a writer's life and career. With the publication of Arthur Miller: A Descriptive Bibliography, George W Crandell, Associate Dean of the Graduate School at Auburn University and a professor of English, has handed Miller scholars a sharp new machete with which to go chopping through the jungle and, perhaps, find a gem.

Crandell is the author of numerous articles on Miller, Tennessee Williams, and Ogden Nash, and he has previously compiled descriptive bibliographies for Williams (U of Pittsburgh P, 1995) andNash (Scarecrow Press, 1990). The current bibliography follows those previous volumes in content and organization, breaking Miller's primary works into eight categories: Separate Publications; Collected Editions; First-appearance Contributions to Books, Pamphlets, and Occasional Publications; First Appearances in Magazines and Newspapers; Translations; Publications in Braille; Music; and Blurbs. Items within the categories are generally arranged chronologically, with the exceptions of Translations - arranged alphabetically by language (Albanian to Yiddish), then by title - and Publications in Braille, arranged alphabetically by title. An Appendix reproduces images of dust jackets, covers, and title pages in black and white, while an accompanying CD-ROM includes color images of the same. These images will be especially useful to the scholar or collector trying to identify specific editions of Miller's works.

Within each category, bibliographic items are described in great detail. Section A: Separate Publications, for example, chronologically lists books, broadsides and pamphlets "wholly or substantially by Miller - including English and American first editions" (1). Each of the forty-six entries in this chapter includes a complete description of the book's binding, dust jacket, title page, copyright page, size, collation, and pagination, library holdings, and notes. The entries for Separate Publications and Collected Editions completely reproduce all text from covers, jackets, title and copyright pages, with typographical markers indicating line breaks and spacing. For collected works, Crandell reproduces the complete tables of contents to help the researcher identify the individual works contained therein.

In addition to the usual primary sources (separate publications, book chapters, pamphlets, magazine and newspaper articles, etc.) the bibliography yields a number of curiosities. Section F: Music consists of five "titles by Miller, set to music, [including] songs with lyrics by Miller and operatic works with librettos either by Miller or based upon the work of Miller" (209). Section G: Blurbs is a diverse list of fourteen items for which Miller provided ad copy, including a novel by Yevgeny Yevtushenko, a study of street gangs, a biography of Tennessee Williams, a memoir of John Berryman and the 1930s, and a promotional bookmark for Gotham Book Mart and Gallery (41 West 47th Street, New York City). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Arthur Miller: A Descriptive Bibliography
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.