LOFT-Y Connections: Accepting My Deafness and Getting an Internship

By Cimento, Elisa | Volta Voices, May/June 2013 | Go to article overview

LOFT-Y Connections: Accepting My Deafness and Getting an Internship


Cimento, Elisa, Volta Voices


Last June, I attended AG Bell's program Leadership Opportunities for Teens (LOFT), which changed the way I think about my hearing loss and led to my coming of age in ways that I am still realizing. When I got on the plane to head back home after the program was over, I had three major take-aways:

1. I had a cell phone with 20 new numbers of people who are deaf and hard of hearing when previously I had known only one other person "like me."

2. There was a flash-drive in the mail that held more pictures than I have taken in a lifetime, and I was only gone for four days.

3. It suddenly seemed unthinkable that I ever lived my life being unable to accept my deafness. Everything I do not like about my deafness does not go away, of course, but suddenly the "problems" are easier and not as scary as before. I no longer feel ashamed of who I am; instead, those who treat me as less than I am are now the problem, not me.

Fast forward six months later and I am immersed in finals during my first semester of college. My friends at other colleges are either ignoring me, or being ignored by me, because they are either pursuing grades or because they started winter break earlier. High school friends have been forgotten because the old, terrifying finals in AP classes have been replaced by the stress of 10-page papers. My college friends are either having nervous breakdowns or getting close to one after a week of minimal sleep. Coffee is now a necessity, not a nice drink. In the midst of this time period I receive an email. It is a friend from LOFT who heard of an internship for someone interested in hearing health science. Was I?

When I started college as a young, naïve freshman, I was unaware of many things. One of my biggest surprises was how many of my fellow classmates with typical hearing were interested in speech and hearing sciences. These courses were very popular and hard to get into. At the same time, four months after LOFT, I was beginning to feel lonely and weary of being "different" once again. Texting was the only interaction I had with my LOFT friends. It felt weird being out in the hearing world without much exposure to the world of deafness and hearing loss. I missed being around people who knew what I was talking about when my tinnitus started up again. I missed personally knowing people who understood how hearing aids and speechreading work. I missed learning about and understanding deafness, which is something that I had grown up with, but knew so little about before.

Yes, I was interested in the job!

So I applied for, and got a position as an intern for the Hearing Industries Association. The organization has been advocating for the passage of the Hearing Aid Tax Credit. If enacted, it would provide a $500 tax credit per hearing aid available once every five years.

Specifically, I was hired to help plan and prepare for the association's combined annual meeting and "Hearing on the Hill" event, their three-day conference which raises awareness about hearing loss.

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