Indigenous Poverty: The Cost of Doing Not Enough

By Frankel, Sid | Winnipeg Free Press, June 21, 2013 | Go to article overview
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Indigenous Poverty: The Cost of Doing Not Enough


Frankel, Sid, Winnipeg Free Press


The Canadian Centre on Policy Alternatives and Save the Children have posed a disturbing question in the title of their report released on Wednesday: Poverty or Prosperity? The report is about poverty experienced by indigenous children in Canada, but the question is about all of us. The future of indigenous children will be an important determinant of the prosperity and health of all Canadians, and, especially, of our children.

We have become jaded about indigenous child poverty. We might be concerned, but we don't really feel that there is anything we can and should do. By and large our media and politicians ignore the issues, or worse, pay lip service to it. The federal government's residential schools apology showed us talk is cheap, but poverty is partially a result of the social and economic deprivation caused by the residential schools and similar colonial policies. That attitude of ignoring the problem is held at our own peril: There will be a high cost to our prosperity if we continue to do nothing.

Eight years ago, in the last days of the federal Liberal government, Canada's premiers, then prime minister Paul Martin and indigenous leaders signed a $5-billion agreement to deal with the drivers and consequences of indigenous poverty. Had it been implemented, all Canadians would be better off today.

Manitobans should be especially concerned about this because approximately 16 per cent of indigenous children live in Manitoba, compared with three per cent of non-indigenous children. Even more important, Manitoba experiences the second-highest rate of poverty among First Nations children (62 per cent) and the highest rate among Metis, Inuit and non-status children (just over 30 per cent).

First, the indigenous population is much younger than the Canadian population as a whole, with a much greater proportion of children. Therefore, we need indigenous children to grow into healthy, productive adults, filling some of the skilled labour shortages.

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