The NOICC/SOICC Network: Policy, Programs, and Partners, 1976-2000

By Lester, Juliette N.; Woods, James et al. | Career Development Quarterly, June 2013 | Go to article overview

The NOICC/SOICC Network: Policy, Programs, and Partners, 1976-2000


Lester, Juliette N., Woods, James, Carlson, Burton L., Career Development Quarterly


This historical and reflective account of the National Occupational Information Coordinating Committee's (NOICC) and the State Occupational Information Coordinating Committees' (SOICCs) significant development of a national infrastructure that shaped career development policy, practice, and training from 1976 to 2000 offers key lessons for future development practice and potential in the United States and beyond. The establishment of the NOICC/SOICC network marked a turning point in the systematic development and delivery of standardized occupational information and supporting resources designed to meet the needs of career development, education and training program design, and employer information requirements. NOICC's core occupational information activities and national career development guidelines and programs are discussed. Public policy that supports career information and counseling services is suggested.

Keywords: NOICC/SOICC network, public policy

The National Occupational Information Coordinating Committee (NOICC) was a federal interagency coordinating committee whose members eventually represented 10 agencies involved in various aspects of the U.S. economy. Member agencies included key offices of five federal departments: Labor: Employment and Training Administration and the Bureau of Labor Statistics; Education: National Center for Education Statistics, Office of Vocational and Adult Education, Rehabilitation Services Administration, Office of Postsecondary Education, and Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Language Affairs; Commerce: Economic Development Administration; Defense: Office of Force Management and Personnel; and Agriculture: Office of Small Community and Rural Development.

State Occupational Information Coordinating Committees (SOICCs), NOICC's state partners, represented state agencies concerned with job training, vocational and technical education, employment security, vocational rehabilitation, economic development, higher education, and more. Together, NOICC and SOICCs formed an integrated network of developers and users of occupational and labor market information and career development initiatives. Established by Congress in 1976, with subsequent legislative amendments, the NOICC/SOICC network was a unique federal-state partnership that provided a framework for addressing workforce development and career preparation issues and opportunities.

The work of the NOICC/SOICC network was based on the idea that if people were guided on how to make informed choices about education, training, jobs, and careers, this would improve the skills and productivity of the workforce, the match between workers and the needs of the labor market, and the competitiveness of the U.S. economy. This meant making sure people had the skills and information they needed to make informed choices. To accomplish this mission, the NOICC/SOICC network developed and implemented occupational, labor market, career information, and career development systems and programs that could be adapted for use at the state and local level. NOICC provided the leadership, technical assistance, and training to carry out this ambitious agenda. SOICCs developed, adapted, distributed, and encouraged use of the systems and programs in their states.

Training was a vital and fundamental component of all NOICC/SOICC initiatives. NOICC's train-the-trainers workshops and other training programs for SOICCs and members of the broader network crosscut all program areas, including information development, delivery, and use, as well as youth and adult career development. SOICCs conducted state and local train-the-trainers workshops in their states. Several professional associations, including the National Career Development Association (NCDA), were NOICC's partners at many joint conferences and in training programs.

Congress established the NOICC/SOICC network in the Vocational Education Amendments of 1976 and subsequent regulations.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The NOICC/SOICC Network: Policy, Programs, and Partners, 1976-2000
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.