Don't Misrepresent Native Americans

By Tallent, Rebecca | The Quill, May/June 2013 | Go to article overview

Don't Misrepresent Native Americans


Tallent, Rebecca, The Quill


IT HAS BEEN HAPPENING a lot lately: Native Americans misrepresented in the media, often with animal images.

Whether it is Michelle Williams' AnOther Magazine photo shoot where she is dressed as a Native American in a wolf-like costume or a former Minnesota TV news director posting on Facebook an "Indian and other animals" are on his front lawn, once again Native Americans are being described in media as anything but human.

Some mainstream media ventured into reporting on the case of a Cheyenne River Sioux elder's allegations that he was mistreated by medical staff at the Rapid City Hospital in South Dakota, violating his human rights. In his federal lawsuit, Vern Traversie said the letters "KKK" were carved into his abdomen, plus he was verbally abused and refused pain medicine.

The problem with the reporting, said Native American Journalists Association President Rhonda LeValdo, is many mainstream news groups, including The Associated Press and the Los Angeles Times, used comparisons of religious images in inanimate objects, such as a water stain or a taco shell, to describe the people who believe the elder's story. Not an animal, but not human either.

Add to this an exchange last year between Matt Lauer and Meredith Vieira on NBC's "Today" when Lauer jokingly called Vieira an "Indian giver," a stereotypical expression that says a Native American cannot be trusted.

NAJA keeps an eye on some of the words and images used by media that put Native Americans in a negative light, and lately the images have been coming rather fast, a lot from the news.

Despite the "Twilight" saga's use of turning Native Americans into wolves as a "romantic" notion, the vast majority of Indian tribes consider transforming from human into animals as witchcraft. This is evil magic in most native cultures; to have the image of people as animals in the news fosters the "Twilight" idea this is acceptable in native cultures, when it is not. Plus, the images and stereotypical words dehumanizes people, making Native Americans "other" in society not worthy of coverage.

LeValdo has criticized the misrepresentation of Native American cultures in the media, especially in news.

"When reporting on Native American issues like this, journalists and media outlets should be mindful of the context of what is being reported," she said in an NAJA statement.

Speaking about the Williams magazine photo shoot, LeValdo said journalists should be especially careful with images.

"Anytime a non-native person is styled to appear Native American, it perpetuates a stereotype that all native people look like this, that native people do not exist or even evokes comparisons of this group to mythical beings," she said. …

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