Volunteer Denies Care of Child with Disabilities

By Laabs, Jennifer J. | Personnel Journal, October 1994 | Go to article overview

Volunteer Denies Care of Child with Disabilities


Laabs, Jennifer J., Personnel Journal


In today's complicated world, ethical decisions aren't always black or white; options often fall into gray areas, and it takes careful thought to determine the best step to take. Readers responded to this situation posed by PERSONNEL JOURNAL.

THE DILEMMA:

* You are HR manager at a small company. For the past two years, your organization has allowed child visitation on Fridays during the summer months. Your department created a center where the children can participate in planned activities, watch movies and read books. A volunteer from the community watches the children, so the program costs the company little. So far, the policy has been successful: Employees save on child-care costs, breakdowns in child care are less likely to cause employee absences, and they're able to remain more focused on their jobs. The problem is this: Recently, an employee began bringing his child who has a mental disability and requires extra attention. The child doesn't pose any threat to the other children, but the volunteer who works in the facility says that if the child continues to attend, she'll quit. If she does, you're unsure that you'll find someone else who's willing to run the facility every Friday free of charge. What should you do?

READERS RESPOND:

You already have a problem: This "volunteer" is really an employee according to the Department of Labor's Wages and Hours unit, and should have received pay all this time. It's time the company decided if it's cost effective to continue the center with a paid (and preferably trained) staffer.

Linda Konstan Senior Consultant, HR & Employee Benefits Find/SVP New York, New York

* First, I'd tell the volunteer that I understand her concerns; however, I didn't appreciate the ultimatum. I'd ask if there were any assistance we could provide that would make it easier to accommodate the child and the volunteer. If this didn't handle the problem, I'd let the volunteer go.

Secondly, I'd pose the argument that it would not only be discriminatory, but a poor business decision if we didn't allow the child into the center.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Volunteer Denies Care of Child with Disabilities
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.