Using Picture Books with Adolescent Readers to Enhance Literacy Instruction

By Senokossoff, Gwyn W. | Reading Horizons, April/May 2013 | Go to article overview

Using Picture Books with Adolescent Readers to Enhance Literacy Instruction


Senokossoff, Gwyn W., Reading Horizons


Abstract

This article discusses the benefits of using picture books with adolescent readers, describes strategies that can be taught with picture books, and provides examples of books the author has used. Some of the topics discussed include: reading comprehension, visual literacy, interactive read-aloud with facilitative talk, literary elements, and content-area reading. The advantages and disadvantages of using e-books and picture books that can be accessed online are also discussed. An annotated bibliography with more than 50 picture books is included in Appendix A. The books that may be accessed as e-books or audio CDs are also identified. Appendix B contains a list of books and websites where print, digital, and online resources can be found.

Introduction

For those who have spent any time studying children's literature, picture books are a familiar and well-loved tool for teaching reading. Many of us have spent hours poring over the most recent arrivals in the children's section of our local bookstore or library. We continue to collect picture books, fondly remembering the times we shared bedtime stories with our own children. However, if you have spent anytime reviewing picture books recently, then you know that many of today's picture books are not written for young children. Publishers now offer an assortment of picture books that deal with topics like interpersonal relationships, physical abuse, peer pressure, drug abuse, teen violence, and psychological issues such as suicide, cutting, and eating disorders (Lightsey, Olliff, & Cain, 2006). Picture books can be found in digital as well as traditional format, and in fiction and non-fiction. The vivid artwork engages visually-oriented youth who are used to learning through technology (Ammon & Sherman, 1997). Because there is less text for these students to read, and illustrations to support the story, these books work well with delayed readers, ESL students, and students with special needs (Carr, Buchanan, Wentz, Weiss, & Brant, 2001; Henry & Simpson, 2001). Yet, based upon my experiences and earlier research (Duchein & Mealey, 1993; Megyeri, 1993), I have not seen many middle or high-school teachers using picture books in their classrooms. Perhaps these teachers have not been taught how to use picture books with older readers or they do not know how to locate books that are appropriate for older students. Regardless, I believe these teachers are missing a great opportunity to supplement the materials they use in their classroom and support the needs of all their students. In this paper, I will discuss the benefits of using picture books with adolescent readers, describe strategies that work well with picture books, and provide examples of books that I have used. I will also discuss the use e-books and picture books that can be accessed online. An annotated bibliography with more than 50 picture books is included in Appendix A. I have also identified which books may be accessed as an e-book or audio CD. Appendix ? contains a list of books and websites where print, digital, and online resources can be found.

Benefits of Using Picture Books

Reading Comprehension

Twelve years ago, many researchers concluded that adolescent students were being short-changed by literacy educators across the curriculum (Moore, et al., 1999). Little research had been done in adolescent literacy and many of our students were in trouble. In their 2012 position statement on Adolescent Literacy, the International Reading Association (IRA) is more positive. An abundance of research has been done since 1999 and our adolescents are making some progress. However, these students still need comprehension and study strategies that can be used across a range of both print and non-print materials in all disciplines (IRA, 2012). Literacy instruction today must include skills like activating prior knowledge, predicting, questioning, summarizing, synthesizing information from multiple sources, and understanding key vocabulary (IRA, 2012).

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Using Picture Books with Adolescent Readers to Enhance Literacy Instruction
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.