A Brief of Chronology

Judicature, May/June 2013 | Go to article overview

A Brief of Chronology


The American Judicature Society and Court Reform

1906 Roscoe Pound addresses the ABA on "the causes of popular dissatisfaction with the administration of justice"

1912 Herbert Harley distributes his "circular letter concerning the administration of justice"

1913 First Meeting of the American Judicature Society is held in Chicago

1913 AJS is incorporated on July 15

1913 Charles Ruggles donates $40,000 to support the Society

1914 Bulletins I-VII are published covering a wide range of topics, including a model state judicial act, a model metropolitan court act, and other functions

1917 Volume one of the Journal is published

1918 Model Bar Association Act is published in the Journal

1919 Bulletin XIV, model rules of civil procedure, is published

1921 North Dakota becomes the first state to integrate its bar

1925 Charles Ruggles discontinues support for the Society

1928 The Society is reorganized; readers of the Journal are asked to become members

1929 Charles Evans Hughes becomes the first AJS president

1931 The Society moves from Chicago to Ann Arbor, Michigan

1940 Missouri adopts the AJS plan for the nonpartisan selection of judges, today called the Missouri Plan

1945 Herbert Harley retires and is replaced by Glenn Winters

1954 The Society moves into the ABA center in Chicago

1959 National Conference on Judicial Selection and Court Administration is held in Chicago, the first nationwide event of its kind, giving rise to the Citizen's Conferences

1969 First National Conference on Judicial Retirement and Disability Commissions, later becoming Conference on Judicial Conduct

1973 First educational program for nominating commissioners is held in Missouri

1974 The Key to Judicial Merit Selection: The Nominating Process is published

1975 A Handbook for Judges is published

1976 National Citizen's Conference on improving courts and justice is held in Philadelphia

1977 President Carter implements a nominating commission for federal circuit courts after an AJS recommendation

1977 AJS Center for Judicial Conduct Organizations is established

1979 Volume 1 of the Judicial Conduct Reporter is published

1980 American Trial Judges: Their Work Styles and Performance is published

1981 Judicial Discipline and Disability Digest is first published

1984 Beyond Reproach: Ethical Restrictions and Extrajudicial Activities of State and Federal Judges is published

1985 Conference on the American Jury and the Law is held in Wisconsin

1985 Reporting on the Courts and the Law, a series of workshops for journalists, begins

1987 Conference on Child Abuse and the Courts is held in Wisconsin

1990 National program for Reporting on the Courts and the Law is held at a number of locations around the country, including the University of Alabama-Tuscaloosa and Tampa

1990 National "the Future and the Courts" conference is held in San Antonio, organized alongside the State Justice Institute

1991 Elmo B. …

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