Today in Music History - Aug. 13

The Canadian Press, August 2, 2013 | Go to article overview

Today in Music History - Aug. 13


Today in Music History - Aug. 13

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Today in Music History for Aug. 13:

In 1820, engineer and musicologist Sir George Grove, compiler of "Grove's Dictionary of Music and Musicians," was born in London.

In 1924, Vernon Dalhart recorded what was to become country music's first million-seller, "The Prisoner's Song." Dalhart became one of the most successful artists of the first half of the 20th century. He made more than 5,000 records for 30 labels under more than 100 different names.

In 1951, singer-songwriter Dan Fogelberg was born in Peoria, Ill. Among his best-selling albums are 1978's "Twin Sons of Different Mothers," recorded with flutist Tim Weisberg, and 1979's "Phoenix." His hit songs include "Longer" and "Same Auld Lang Syne." Noticeably hesitant about live appearances, Fogelberg once backed out of opening for Elton John at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles. After battling prostate cancer for three years, he died on Dec. 16, 2007.

In 1952, the career of songwriters and producers Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller was launched when Big Mama Thornton recorded their "Hound Dog." It topped the R&B chart for seven weeks the following year. Elvis Presley's version was a No. 1 pop hit in 1956. Some of Leiber and Stoller's other hits include "Kansas City" for Wilbert Harrison, "Yakety Yak" and "Charlie Brown" for "The Coasters" and "Love Me Tender" for Elvis.

In 1965, "The Jefferson Airplane" made their first appearance at the opening of the Matrix Club, which was to introduce many of the new San Francisco bands over the next few years. The club was owned by Marty Balin, a founding member of "The Jefferson Airplane."

In 1966, "Summer in the City" by "The Lovin' Spoonful" was the No. 1 song on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. It was the group's only No. 1 record.

In 1967, the Daughters of the American Revolution refused to allow Joan Baez to perform at Constitution Hall in Washington because of her opposition to the Vietnam War. She instead performed at an outdoor theater near the Washington Monument.

In 1968, soul singer Joe Hinton died at age 39. His death came four years after his version of Willie Nelson's "Funny (How Time Slips Away)" made the top-20 of the Billboard pop chart.

In 1971, saxophonist King Curtis was stabbed to death in a fight outside his home in New York City. He was 37. Curtis appeared on countless rock 'n' roll records in the 1950s and '60s, particularly after his much-praised solo on "The Coasters'" 1957 hit "Yakety-Yak." Curtis also recorded with his own band, first called "Soul Incorporated" and then "The Kingpins," and had such hits as "Soul Twist," "Spanish Harlem" and "Memphis Soul Stew."

In 1972, John Lennon and Yoko Ono gave two concerts at Madison Square Garden in New York, raising $250,000 for mentally challenged children. John and Yoko also personally donated $60,000.

In 1975, Bruce Springsteen and his band began a five-night stand at the Bottom Line club in New York. Although rock critics had already hailed Springsteen as the "new Bob Dylan," he was not widely known by the record-buying public. But his Bottom Line engagement drew further raves and wide publicity, establishing him as a rising star. Within two months, Springsteen was on the cover of both Time and Newsweek.

In 1976, the political punk rock band "The Clash" played its first concert at a rehearsal hall in a London suburb. It was a private affair for critics and friends of the group.

In 1977, lead guitarist Randy Bachman departed the Canadian rock band "Bachman-Turner Overdrive" for a solo career. The group's popularity had peaked in 1974 and '75 with such hits as "Takin' Care of Business," "You Ain't Seen Nothing Yet" and "Roll On Down the Highway." After Bachman's departure, "BTO" would release two more albums before disbanding.

In 1980, four intruders robbed rock musician Todd Rundgren, his girlfriend and three guests at his home in Woodstock, N. …

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