The Impact of Teaching Academic Education Course of Children with Special Needs in the Ordinary Schools on Students' Attitudes toward Inclusion of Disabled Children

By Salem, Abdelbaky Arafa | Journal of Education and Learning, June 1, 2013 | Go to article overview

The Impact of Teaching Academic Education Course of Children with Special Needs in the Ordinary Schools on Students' Attitudes toward Inclusion of Disabled Children


Salem, Abdelbaky Arafa, Journal of Education and Learning


Abstract

The present study aimed at identifying the attitudes of the teacher student towards including students with special needs with the ordinary ones. Also, to determine whether there are statistically significant differences between students who have studied the academic education course of children with special needs in the ordinary schools and the students who have not studied this course in the Department of Special Education, Majmaah University for the academic year 1433 - 1432 A H . The study concluded that there are statistically significant differences between the children of the fifth level who have studied the academic education course of children with special needs in the ordinary schools and the children of the fourth level who have not studied this academic course. Also, the study concluded that both of the students of Level IV and V have a positive attitudes towards inclusion of disabled students in the ordinary schools.

Keywords: attitudes, inclusion, children with special needs, students of department of special education

1. Introduction

The educational inclusion is considered one of the most modern programs in the education of disabled students, especially those with mild disabilities. The countries all over the world do its best to provide all the educational, social and healthy services suitable for students with special needs and that facilitate their inclusion in the society and education. The organizations and conferences with attention to the education and care for the disabled people called for their right to include into the society and this right is guaranteed by the Constitution.

In recent years, many countries all over the world move towards including disabled children with ordinary ones. Many educators not only ask for inclusion, but also support the comprehensive inclusion and the complete totality that means the education for all students, regardless of the degree of disability in the ordinary school. The schools should provide the supportive services.

To achieve the inclusion, it is necessary to prepare the community in all its classes to accept the social and educational inclusion for the disabled students. The importance of the direction as (Martin, Makelmen, 1974 ) and his colleagues say that the success of the process of inclusion mainly depend on the attitudes of teachers towards the inclusion, since the attitudes of teachers positively or negatively affect the achievement of the student and the behavior of both teacher and student (14).

Although this is such an important area, limited international studies have been carried out to understand pre-service teachers' concerns and preparedness for teaching diverse learners (see Forlin, Douglas, & Hattie, 1996; Forlin, 2001; Forlin, Jobling, & Carroll, 2001; Loreman, 002; Sharma, Ee, & Desai, 2003, Umesh Sharma,Chris Forlin ,Chris2006 ). Indeed, this was also highlighted by the Salamanca

Statement that emphasized a need for collaboration and networking amongst member nations in research and teaching on inclusive education. Research examining attitudes and similar constructs (e.g., concerns about implementing inclusion, and sentiments towards persons with disabilities) within an international framework may shed lights on role of factors that are context specific (example policy/legislative framework or cultural context). This may have useful implications both for teacher trainers as well as policy makers.

Hence the verification of the trends and feelings of the ordinary teachers and the teachers of special education towards the disabled students and towards accepting their inclusion in the ordinary classes is important. So, it provides one of the most important conditions of the success of inclusion programs.

As Zidan Alsartawi mentioned, it is necessary to verify the feelings of ordinary teachers and their attitudes towards disabled students. Also, it is necessary to work to acquire the necessary skills to work with them. …

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