Today in History - Nov. 5

The Canadian Press, October 25, 2013 | Go to article overview

Today in History - Nov. 5


Today in History - Nov. 5

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Today in History for Nov. 5:

On this date:

In 1605, Guy Fawkes was found in the basement of Britain's Parliament Buildings, along with 36 barrels of gunpowder. His arrest foiled a plot to blow up the buildings and kill King James I during the next day's opening of Parliament. Britons mark Guy Fawkes day each Nov. 5th with bonfires.

In 1803, weekly public markets were established in Toronto, then called York.

1872, suffragette Susan B. Anthony became the first American woman to vote in a presidential election, albeit illegally. She was later convicted by a judge and fined $100, but refused to pay the fine.

In 1873, Prime Minister John A. Macdonald's federal government resigned over evidence some members had accepted money from Canadian Pacific Railway president Sir Hugh Allen in return for the contract to build the line.

In 1895, George B. Selden of Rochester, N.Y., received the first U.S. patent for an "improved Road Engine."

In 1917, in Moscow, following the abdication of Russian Czar Nicholas II, the Orthodox Church Council of 1917-1918 restored the office of patriarch, suppressed by Peter the Great in 1700.

In 1923, Alberta ended seven years of Prohibition.

In 1930, American author Sinclair Lewis was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.

In 1940, Franklin Roosevelt became the only American president to be elected to a third term in office. A later amendment to the U.S. Constitution bars presidents from serving more than two consecutive terms.

In 1956, Canadian Major-General E.L.M. Burns was named the first commander of the UN peacekeeping force in Egypt. Burns held the post for three years.

In 1962, the political committee of the United Nations approved a Canadian-proposed formula for halting above-ground nuclear bomb tests by Jan. 1, 1963.

In 1968, Richard M. Nixon was elected U.S. president, defeating Vice-President Hubert H. Humphrey and American Independent candidate George C. Wallace.

In 1974, Ella T. Grasso was elected governor of Connecticut, the first woman to win a gubernatorial office without succeeding her husband. In 1924, Nellie T. Ross of Wyoming was elected to serve out the remaining term of her late husband, William B. Ross.

In 1979, cartoonist Al Capp, creator of the comic strip "Li'l Abner," died.

In 1981, Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau and nine premiers, all except Quebec's, announced a deal had been reached on patriating the Constitution from Britain. The agreement also included an amending formula and a two-tiered Charter of Rights. The Queen officially proclaimed the Constitution on April 17, 1982.

In 1992, U.S. chess legend Bobby Fischer clinched a $5 million chess match against Russian Boris Spassky, marking a triumphant return after 20 years in self-imposed obscurity.

In 1994, at age 83, former U.S. president Ronald Reagan announced he had been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease.

In 1995, an intruder armed with a knife broke into 24 Sussex Drive and made it as far as the bedroom where Prime Minister Jean Chretien and his wife were sleeping. The intruder came face-to-face with Aline Chretien, who slammed and locked the door, then called security.

In 1996, Russian President Boris Yeltsin had quintuple heart bypass surgery.

In 1996, Quebec Lt-.Gov. Jean-Louis Roux resigned after admitting he wore a Nazi swastika in the Second World War and took part in anti-conscription protests during which Jewish stores were damaged.

In 1996, U.S. President Bill Clinton won re-election, becoming the first Democratic presidential candidate in 52 years to win two consecutive elections.

In 1997, Saskatchewan farmer Robert Latimer was convicted for a second time of second-degree murder in the 1993 death of his disabled daughter in what he said was mercy killing. …

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