Length of Study-Time Behaviour and Academic Achievement of Social Studies Education Students in the University of Uyo

By Ukpong, D. E.; George, I. N. | International Education Studies, March 2013 | Go to article overview

Length of Study-Time Behaviour and Academic Achievement of Social Studies Education Students in the University of Uyo


Ukpong, D. E., George, I. N., International Education Studies


Abstract

This study investigated the length of study time behaviour and academic achievement of Social Studies Education students in the University of Uyo. The purpose was to determine the difference in the academic achievement of the long study time behaviour students and their short study time behaviour counterparts in Social Studies Education. The study used 120 social studies students of the University of Uyo representing 2% of the population. The researchers administered the instrument personally to the students selected. The t-test statistics was used to analyse the data generated for the study. From the result, the null hypothesis was rejected. Hence the academic performance of the long study time behaviour students was significantly different from that of their short study time counterparts. In view of the findings, it was recommended that students should set a study time table long enough for effective academic exercises (at least two to three hours daily) for their private study and stick to it.

Keywords: length of study-time behaviour , academic achievement, social studies, education students

1. Introduction

In any school system, academic performance is the priority to students as well as the teachers. Several studies have shown that factors such as motivation and study time have impacted on students' achievement (Cote & Levine, 2000, Singth, Granville & Dika, 2002).

Since grade is a primary parameter of such learning, if a learner earns high grades it is thought that he/she has learned well while low grades indicate poor learning outcome. However, many have also found out that several factors contribute to the grades. No single factor can be taken in isolation as predicting grades. It has been an influence of so many factors such as gender, IQ, study habits, study time, age, year of study, level of parent's educational attainment, social status, number of children, birth order, etc. In fact, almost all the above environmental, personal and natural factors exert influence on academic performance.

The determinants of academic performance are a recurrent topic in public policy debates on higher education. One largely unsettled issue concerns the impact of the most essential factors in the educational production, student's effort and study time on academic achievement. While many would probably agree that students will not learn unless they put forth some amount of effort, our understanding of the ways study time impacts on performance as measures by attaining a certain course grade is rather limited. Quantifying the effect of study time on achievement seems important from at least two perspectives i.e from the perspective of the instructor, who creates classroom learning, experiences and measures learning outcomes, and finally from the perspective of the student who seeks to balance competing personal goals.

In recent years, much effort has been dedicated to understanding the parameter affecting success of undergraduate students in higher institutions of learning. Nonis, Philhours, Syamil, and Hudson (2005) analyzed the personality variables of 228 universities students attending a medium size AACSB accredited public university. Using a hierarchical regression model, they discovered that self-reported time per credit hour spent on academic activities outside of classroom explains a significant portion of the variation in the semester grade point average (GPA) for senior students, but has no impact on the cumulative GPA. Brookshire and Palocsay (2005) also analyzed the achievement of undergraduate students in public management and science courses and report that overall academic achievement as measured by students' G.P.A. has a significantly higher impact on achievement than students' mathematical skills as measured by their study time scores.

In predicting students' success, researchers have drawn on results of studies across a broad spectrum of education which concludes that their aptitude, experience, study time, effort and environment contribute significantly to academic achievement. …

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