Sufi Dargah Unites, Ajmer Divides

Hindustan Times (New Delhi, India), November 26, 2013 | Go to article overview

Sufi Dargah Unites, Ajmer Divides


Ajmer, Nov. 26 -- Remember the mesmerising number 'Khawaja mere Khawaja' from Bollywood film Jodha Akbar. It is inspired by the life of 12th-13th century Sufi saint Hazrat Khawaja Moinuddin Chisti.

Even politicians, including those in saffron robes, prefer to kick-start their election campaign after paying their obeisance here at the mazaar (tomb) of the Sufi saint, who promoted understanding between the Muslims and non-Muslims.

But the virtuous atmosphere of tolerance evaporates as soon as the majestic Nizam gate, the main entrance to the shrine, is crossed and people meander into the same shells of religion, caste, sub-caste, etc. as they walk through the Dargah Bazaar, dotted with 400-odd shops selling souvenirs.

And this division is palpable as you find your way through the congested lane - here it is Hindus vs Muslims, Sindhis vs Vaishyas, et al.

Till some years ago, Jains owned a major chunk of the huge Lakhankotri residential area. But as their families and finances grew, they moved to bigger locations, selling their property to Muslims, who mostly live around the dargah and today either run guesthouses or work as khadims (meaning servitor, but in this people who escort pilgrims to the dargah).

The fissures that were simmering since the Babri Masjid destruction in 1992 came on the surface after the Ajmer blast of October 2007. Narendra Modi's plunge into national politics has deepened the divide.

A khadim said, "We were always confident that nothing would happen to Hindu-Muslim unity. The involvement of Hindu religious leaders shocked us." (The police picked up Bhavesh Patel and named RSS leaders complicit in the case.)

The twists and turns in the case gave fodder to the two communities to blame each other in a city where the RSS has been active from the days of the freedom movement. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Sufi Dargah Unites, Ajmer Divides
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.