Correctional Counseling and Rehabilitation, 8th Edition

By Mathias, Jacqueline | American Jails, November/December 2013 | Go to article overview

Correctional Counseling and Rehabilitation, 8th Edition


Mathias, Jacqueline, American Jails


Correctional Counseling and Rehabilitation, 8th Edition Patricia Van Voorhis Emily J. Salisbury Waltham, Mass.: Anderson Publishing 456 pages, $54.95 http://store. elsevier. com

Correctional Counseling and Rehabilitation, 8th Edition is an excellent resource not only for counselors, but for anyone who works in a correctional setting. The authors provide informative and clear descriptions of the various types of offenders with whom correctional staff may encounter in their facilities. They also discuss the types of programming and structures that have proven to be most effective-and in some cases, most ineffective-in managing and treating offenders.

In my 10 years experience in the mental health field, I have been often asked by correctional officers and staff about the inmates who present with symptoms of mental illness, substance abuse, or traits of a personality disorder, and why or why not they are exhibiting certain behaviors. Many correctional officers and staff have no experience, training, or education involving these populations prior to their work in a correctional setting. This book provides answers and treatment options in a manner that is both relevant and understandable.

Beginning with a description of behaviors exhibited by inmates and the challenges of working in a correctional setting, Correctional Counseling and Rehabilitation is laid out in six parts. Other parts cover the historical foundations of different therapies and how they came to be developed into current therapies, the various offender classification systems, therapies with specific sub-groups in correctional settings, and implementing the policies and programs in a correctional facility.

Specific to the correctional environment, the various types of mental illness, personality disorders, and treatment modals are defined in a manner so that even someone with no background or formal education in behavioral health fields can feel comfortable. Charts that link behaviors and symptoms with the appropriate categories make it easy for readers to follow and apply to real world job experience. This is also accomplished through the case study examples, which provide officers with the basic symptoms most commonly found in individuals who suffer from mental illness. Tips are also given on how to monitor and report those symptoms for follow-up and further evaluation. The descriptions of the subgroups (mental illness, substance abuse, women, sex offenders, and anti-social personality disorders) that often require specialized treatment and behavior plans also help officers to better understand and manage the needs of these inmates. …

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