Books in Brief

The New Crisis, January/February 2003 | Go to article overview

Books in Brief


Zora Neale Hurston: A Life in Letters, collected and edited by Carla Kaplan (Doubleday, $40). The more than 500 letters Hurston wrote to Langston Hughes, Dorothy West, Carl Van Vechten, Carter Woodson, Walter White, Countee Cullen, Charles S. Johnson, Alain Locke, Arthur Spingam, W.E.B. Du Bois and her patron, Charlotte Osgood Mason, among many others, provide a revealing portrait of her vibrant life and the evolution of her personal and professional relationships.

Like a Mighty Stream: The March on Washington, August 28, 1963, by Patrick Henry Bass (Running Press, $18.95). Forty years ago, more than 250,000 people from all races and walks of life marched on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., in support of the passage of a civil rights bill. This commemoration of the historic gathering for jobs, freedom and equality offers an array of eyewitness accounts and chronicles how the effort was organized (including the rarely mentioned contributions of women) and which leaders participated.

Urban Injustice: How Ghettos Happen, by David Hilfiker (Seven Stories Press, $18.95). Rather than pointing to the perceived character shortcomings and ill habits of the poor as the causes of their generational predicament, the author, a medical doctor who cofounded and works at a hospice for formerly homeless men dying of AIDS, considers the roots of poverty by examining this nation's social and historical structures.

Race and Resistance: African Americans in the 2'l tie Century, edited by Herb Boyd (South End Press, $17). In essays on race, the media, reparations, politics and AIDS, among other subjects, leading African American scholars and activists, such as Ron Daniels, Sonia Sanchez, Angela Y Davis and Bill Fletcher of Transafrica, discuss the state of Black America today and strategies for achieving full civil rights and equality. …

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