A Most Masculine State: Gender, Politics, and Religion in Saudi Arabia: Books

By Arenfeldt, Pernille | The Times Higher Education Supplement : THE, October 31, 2013 | Go to article overview

A Most Masculine State: Gender, Politics, and Religion in Saudi Arabia: Books


Arenfeldt, Pernille, The Times Higher Education Supplement : THE


A Most Masculine State: Gender, Politics, and Religion in Saudi Arabia. By Madawi Al-Rasheed. Cambridge University Press. 334pp, Pounds 50.00 and Pounds 18.99. ISBN 9780521761048, 122528 and 9781139602839 (e-book). Published 30 May 2013

A much-viewed YouTube video clip features former US president Jimmy Carter describing religion as a "basic cause" of women's oppression. While not an uncommon claim, it is perhaps most frequently invoked in conversations about women's status in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Because of the reductionist nature of the claim, and because it is so commonplace in relation to Saudi Arabia, Madawi Al-Rasheed's book A Most Masculine State: Gender, Politics, and Religion in Saudi Arabia is both a significant addition to scholarship on gender in the kingdom and a noteworthy contribution to larger debates about gender and religion.

Although Al-Rasheed does not dispute the centrality of religion, she shows that it is a complex interplay between religion and other factors (rather than religion per se) that has resulted in the pronounced gender stratification in Saudi Arabia. Drawing on her earlier research on the nation's history, she argues that "in the absence of a unifying national narrative ... the Saudi state (after 1932) transformed the eighteenth- century Wahhabi religious revival into religious nationalism" with a view to legitimising the newly created political community. The concept of "religious nationalism" is clearly distinct from religion and, although it has been widely used since the 1990s, Al-Rasheed's application of the concept focuses particular attention on important similarities between religious and secular nationalism. When used with such precision, it has considerable analytical value and can facilitate important insights in the relationship between gender, state, politics and religion in a variety of contexts.

The unique form of religious nationalism present in Saudi Arabia combined with intense modernisation has been central to state formation efforts in the kingdom and has influenced the gender system in striking ways. Al- Rasheed argues that considerable fluctuations in the gender gap in Saudi Arabia during the past 50 years can be explained only with reference to politically motivated state interventions, not by religion. This is demonstrated through a meticulous analysis of contradictory trends associated with modernisation initiatives, such as the state-sponsored education of women beginning in the 1960s, state-sanctioned religious opinions (fatwas) issued during the 1980s, and the state's efforts to increase the public presence of (some) women since 2001 in order to protect its international image. …

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