Teen Girls with Mental Health Issues Have Higher Risk of Pregnancy: Study

By Ubelacker, Sheryl | The Canadian Press, February 1, 2014 | Go to article overview

Teen Girls with Mental Health Issues Have Higher Risk of Pregnancy: Study


Ubelacker, Sheryl, The Canadian Press


Mental disorders up risk of teen pregnancy: MDs

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TORONTO - Adolescent girls with a major mental health disorder are three times more likely to get pregnant than those without a mental illness, say researchers, underscoring the need for specialized prevention programs for this vulnerable group of teens.

In a study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics, the researchers examined live birth rates in Ontario from 1999 to 2009 in 4.5 million girls aged 15 to 19, with and without a major mental health illness.

The study found pregnancy rates among girls with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia or major depression were not only three times higher, but they also have been declining at a far slower pace than those for adolescent females without a mental health diagnosis.

Although birth rates for both groups of teen girls dropped over time, the gap between them appeared to be widening slightly during the 10-year study period. Among girls with a major mental illness, live births decreased by only 14 per cent, compared to a 22 per cent drop among those unaffected by psychiatric issues.

"Although we do know some of the risk factors behind why girls with mental health illness may be at increased risk of becoming pregnant, pregnancy-prevention programs in most developed countries have not traditionally considered mental health issues," said lead author Dr. Simone Vigod, a psychiatrist at Women's College Hospital in Toronto.

Vigod said girls from low-income families and those who live in rural areas have a higher risk of teen pregnancy, while having already had a child increases that risk further -- and those factors also hold true for adolescent females with mental health issues.

While the study didn't look specifically at why girls dealing with a psychiatric disorder have higher rates than unaffected girls, it's known that childhood abuse, low self-esteem and substance misuse are all risk factors for having a teenaged pregnancy.

"And very likely, girls with major mental health problems are more likely to have those kinds of social problems and drug and alcohol problems -- problems with impulsivity, feeling badly about themselves," she said.

For example, a teen suffering from depression may find it difficult to protect herself from pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections with a boyfriend because of low self-esteem.

"She just may not have the same capacity to advocate for herself because with depression she feels so negatively about herself. She has trouble asserting herself enough to say, 'We need to use a condom' or 'I don't want to do this.

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Teen Girls with Mental Health Issues Have Higher Risk of Pregnancy: Study
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