Hospital Executives: Continued Shortage of Nurses, Advanced Practitioners, Physicians

American Nurse, January/February 2014 | Go to article overview

Hospital Executives: Continued Shortage of Nurses, Advanced Practitioners, Physicians


WORKFORCE

Seventy-eight percent of hospital executives believe there is a shortage of physicians nationwide, 66 percent believe there is a shortage of nurses, and 50 percent believe there is a shortage of advanced practitioners, according to a new survey conducted by AMN Healthcare, a workforce solutions and staffing services company.

The survey also indicates that the vacancy rate for physicians at hospitals approaches 18 percent, while the vacancy rate for nurses is 17 percent, considerably higher than when AMN Healthcare conducted a similar survey in 2009.

"Change in health care is a continuous evolution, but the one constant is people," said AMN President and Chief Executive Officer Susan Salka. "No matter what models of care are in place, it takes physicians, nurses and other clinicians to provide quality patient care, and the fact is we simply do not have enough of them."

AMN Healthcare's 2013 Clinical Workforce Survey asked hospital executives nationwide to comment on clinical staffing trends affecting their facilities. More than 70 percent rated the staffing of physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners and physician assistants as a high priority in 2013, compared to only 24 percent of hospital executives who rated staffing these professionals as a high priority in AMN Healthcare's 2009 workforce survey. …

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Hospital Executives: Continued Shortage of Nurses, Advanced Practitioners, Physicians
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