Chronology: Arab-Israeli Conflict, January 16, 1998-April 15, 1998

The Middle East Journal, Summer 1998 | Go to article overview

Chronology: Arab-Israeli Conflict, January 16, 1998-April 15, 1998


ABBREVIATIONS

FBIS, Foreign Broadcast Information Service Daily Report-available from the National Technical Information Service, World News Connection on the world wide web at http://wnc.fedworld.gov. The date in the source information refers to the WNC Entry Date.

FT, Financial Times

NYT, The New York Times

WP, The Washington Post

WSJ, The Wall Street Journal

1998

Jan. 16: The European Commission unanimously endorsed a policy document stating that the European Union should increase its participation in peace process negotiations and should be the "key co-ordinator" of all international economic aid underpinning the peace process. [1/17, 1/18 FT]

The US Holocaust Memorial Museum announced its refusal to receive Palestinian National Authority (PNA) president Yasir `Arafat on a state visit to the museum during his forthcoming trip to Washington, DC. [l/17 WP]

Jan. 18: The Israeli cabinet decided not to set a figure for the percentage of land from which to withdraw from the West Bank before Israeli prime minister Binyamin Netanyahu's scheduled meeting with US president Bill Clinton. [1/19 NYT]

Jan. 19: Israeli prime minister Netanyahu arrived in Washington, DC, and attended a Voices United for Israel rally of US Christian and Jewish supporters of Israel. [1/20 NYT]

In Cairo, Egyptian president Husni Mubarak met with PNA president `Arafat to discuss `Arafat's pending visit to Washington, DC. [1/21 FBIS]

In Jericho, a Palestinian military court sentenced Nasim Abu al-Rus and Yasir Samara, both 23-year-old members of the Islamic Resistance Movement (HAMAS), to 15 years' imprisonment with hard labor for preparing the bombs used in suicide attacks on 30 July and 4 September 1997 in Jerusalem. [1/20 NYT]

Jan. 20: In Washington, DC, US president Clinton presented Israeli prime minister Netanyahu with a detailed plan for a phased withdrawal from the West Bank. Netanyahu insisted that Israeli redeployment was dependent on Palestinian compliance with the list of conditions the Israeli cabinet had drawn up on 13 January, which included the drafting of a new Palestinian National Covenant and increasing security measures. [1/21 NYT]

In Paris, PNA president `Arafat and former Israeli prime minister Shimon Peres signed an agreement with the World Bank for investment in West Bank and Gaza businesses for up to $200 million through a new fund, the Peace Technology Fund. [121 NYT]

Jan. 21: For the first time, Israeli prime minister Netanyahu insisted that an agreement to open final status negotiations be a condition for Israeli withdrawal from the West Bank. [1/22 NYT] PNA president `Arafat arrived in Washington, DC, for talks with US president Clinton. [1/22 NYT]

Reversing its earlier decision, the US Holocaust Memorial Museum announced its intention to invite PNA president `Arafat to take a special tour of the museum. [1/22 NYT]

Jan. 22: US officials announced that Israel had offered to withdraw from less than ten percent of the West Bank in three phases over several months. Israel stated it would like to carry out only one withdrawal before a final settlement with the Palestinians was reached. PNA president `Arafat, during his meeting with US president Clinton, insisted that the proposed Israeli withdrawal was insufficient and that there should be three "credible" Israeli withdrawals before a final settlement could be reached. [1/23 NYT]

Jan. 23: According to Nabil Sha`th, PNA planning minister and chief negotiator, US president Clinton relayed an offer from Israeli prime minister Netanyahu to PNA president `Arafat for an Israeli withdrawal from nine percent of the West Bank that would exclude any further withdrawal before final negotiations. PNA president `Arafat rejected the offer. [1/24 WP]

Jan. 25: In Cairo, Egyptian president Mubarak met Jordan's King Husayn to discuss the stalemate in the peace process. …

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