A Raise Would Generate More Economic Activity, Reduce Public Assistance

By Takamine, Dwight | Honolulu Star - Advertiser, March 16, 2014 | Go to article overview

A Raise Would Generate More Economic Activity, Reduce Public Assistance


Takamine, Dwight, Honolulu Star - Advertiser


Many of today's labor laws and worker protections have their roots in the Great Depression. The late-19th and early-20th centuries were a time of economic and social instability that included labor strife and violence. In Hawaii, the struggle to organize the plantations included disruptive strikes and violence, including incidents in Hanapepe, Kauai, where 16 workers and four sheriffs perished in 1924, and in Hilo in 1938, when police injured 50 people in firing their riot guns.

During the Great Depression, Americans' view of unions changed as widespread economic hardship created sympathy for working people. President Franklin D. Roosevelt initiated a series of important laws that advanced labor's cause: The National Recovery Act provided for collective bargaining, the National Labor Relations Act established the National Labor Relations Board to punish unfair labor practices and to organize elections when employees wanted to form unions, and the Social Security Act initiated the development of states' unemployment insurance programs.

The last significant piece of New Deal legislation was the Fair Labor Standards Act, which provided minimum-wage and overtime protections for workers to alleviate labor disputes and promote the "health, efficiency, and general well-being of workers."

It is important to remember our history, to provide context as debate over raising the minimum wage continues into the second half of this Legislature.

We are in our eighth year without an increase while the average annual salary has increased $4,200 since 2007. The minimum wage is higher in 21 states and D.C., despite Hawaii having the highest cost of living. Using data from the Consumer Price Index (CPI) and the Department of Business Economic Development and Tourism forecast for 2013-2015, a worker would have to be paid $8.57 by 2013, $8.78 by 2014 and $9 by 2015 to have the same purchasing power as in 2007.

A single parent of one child working at minimum wage 40 hours per week, 52 weeks per year, earns $2,770 or 16 percent below the federal poverty guidelines for a family of two. Hawaii's poverty rate of 17.3 percent makes Hawaii the ninth-poorest in the nation, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. If the minimum wage was increased to $8.20 an hour in January 2015, that single parent with one child as defined above would still fall $1,034 below the 2014 federal poverty guidelines for Hawaii.

More than 1 in 6 children under age 18 live in poverty in the United States. Research of early childhood development has found that income insecurity negatively affects three key aspects of brain development: positive relationships, learning resources and high stress. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Raise Would Generate More Economic Activity, Reduce Public Assistance
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.