Backtalk


Crude Policies

"The Thirty-Year Itch" (March/ April) does a good job of distinguishing between oil for fuel (oil as profits for American oil companies) versus oil for power (oil as a way for the United States to control Europe and China). Clearly, Iraq is about oil as power. But author Robert Dreyfuss could have done more to draw out the role of the oil companies in planning an occupation of the Middle East. Focusing so much on the Bush administration and the Republicans could lead us into the arms of Democratic "moderates" who are just as interested in long-term occupation of the Middle East for oil (as power), but want to delay until they can convince the American people and foreign powers to support it.

MICHAEL LYON San Francisco, California

Control the world's oil supply, Dreyfuss suggests, and you control the world. Well, why not, if we can do it easily? It's a mighty hard prospect to resist. If we don't, others will, and the longer we wait, the harder it will get. It might be time for some good old manifest destiny. We could bring developing countries a lot more resources than they have now, and they can give us new markets to develop.

KEVIN MCELROY Waterbury, Connecticut

I wish to commend you on an extremely well-researched investigation of U.S. global expansion. My only criticism is that you failed to mention the strategic importance of the Caspian region, which may contain up to 200 billion barrels of oil reserves. Some of those reserves are slated to flow through the Baku pipeline to refineries in Turkey. Basing U.S. forces in Turkey would therefore have served a dual role: providing a front line in the invasion of Iraq, and guarding the flow of oil against disruptions caused by those opposed to the devastation of the Caspian ecosystem.

ROBERT OVETZ Sausalito, California

Your article is dead-on. The effect of a war in Iraq will be to subsidize the price of oil at the pump through military expenditures, causing us to bum up the world's reserves at an artificially rapid pace. Allowing the oilproducing states to charge a fair price for their product, and perhaps even imposing an additional tax, might give us time to adjust to the looming environmental catastrophe. Instead, we are intent on stealing resources that belong to others and handing them over to suv owners.

WILLIAM ROOD Rochester, Minnesota

Your article about the war with Iraq is extremely comprehensive and factual. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Backtalk
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.