Electronic Business and Commerce in Canada: Introduction to the Special Issue

By Charles H Davis | Canadian Journal of Administrative Sciences, March 2003 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Electronic Business and Commerce in Canada: Introduction to the Special Issue


Charles H Davis, Canadian Journal of Administrative Sciences


The term electronic business and commerce (EB&C) broadly refers to the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) for business purposes, and specifically refers to business transactions based on the Internet or internetworked computing and multimedia. This group of technologies has had massive economic and social impacts in the past decade. The implications of rapid changes in ICTs for our organizations and institutions are just beginning to be understood. In the business world, e-commerce hype and euphoria have given way to a certain wariness and weariness with respect to ICTs. The benefits of ICTs can be great, if the costs, risks, and disruptions can be contained. An extraordinary wave of creative destruction has taken place before our eyes. What are we to make of it?

ICTs are "general purpose technologies" that can increase users' productivity and value-add when embodied in products or services. ICTs can be modified and configured to support a wide range of business objectives, including increased transactional efficiency, product/service innovation, complementarity with other products or services, and high customization of products or services (Amit & Zott, 2001). However, many firms have not found it a simple matter to learn to use these technologies to produce business value, as evidenced by the relatively high failure rates that are reported for IT projects, enterprise applications, and customer relationship management (CRM) systems. ICTs do not just increase connectivity and information processing capability. They can substantially alter communication patterns, organizational routines, and decision-making capability. The applications that generate significant business value are not plug-and-play packages but deeper and more extensive reconfigurations of organizational processes and structures. Positive firm-level return on IT investments requires "co-invention" of value by users (Bresnahan & Greenstein, 2001). These co-invention processes usually require investments in training and organizational development several times greater than the cost of the hardware and software. Adoption of interorganizational EB&C innovations such as electronic marketplaces has slowed for a different reason. Marketplaces that emphasize price-based competition are suitable for commodity products or non-essential inputs but they are considered to undermine longer-term business relationships that involve commitment, trust, and risk-sharing (Rosson & Davis, 2003). However, relational electronic exchanges, involving collaboration in value-added activities, are proving to be attractive, although "tough and complicated" to develop (Jap & Mohr, 2002).

In matters of electronic business and commerce, Canada has special significance. Canada has an enormously important economic stake as a supplier of ICT products and services. In 2000 the Canadian ICT sector included more than 30,000 firms and more than a halfmillion employees. It had revenues of about $132 billion and accounted for about 10% of Canadian exports (Industry Canada, 2001). Until 2001 the Canadian ICT sector grew about four times faster than the Canadian economy and accounted for nearly 20% of Canadian GDP growth between 1997 and 2001. Employment in the ICT sector grew about 3.5 times as fast as employment economy-wide. Furthermore, the Canadian ICT sector is the largest performer of R&D in Canada, representing nearly 46% of private sector R&D in the country (Industry Canada, 2002a).

Furthermore, Canada has made a strong political commitment to encourage the expansion of ICT use in the public and private sectors, and senior Canadian politicians have publicly set EB&C goals for Canada on a number of occasions. In many respects, Canada is a leader or early adopter in EB&C practices and technologies. The Conference Board of Canada's recent briefing note Pursuing Connectedness: Canada's Quest for Global Best (2002) puts Canada in first place among the "e- 10" group of comparable countries regarding demand for ICT products and services and use of them.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Electronic Business and Commerce in Canada: Introduction to the Special Issue
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.