Success Is All That Was Expected: The South Atlantic Blockading Squadron during the Civil War

By Browning, Robert M., Jr. | Sea Classics, June 2003 | Go to article overview

Success Is All That Was Expected: The South Atlantic Blockading Squadron during the Civil War


Browning, Robert M., Jr., Sea Classics


SUCCESS IS ALL THAT WAS EXPECTED: The South Atlantic Blockading Squadron During the Civil War. By Robert M. Browning, Jr. 432 Ppgs, Photos & Maps, 6''x9'', Cloth. ISBN: 1-57488-514-6 - $34.95. Brassey's, Inc.

Thanks to newsmaking archaeological efforts such as the recent raising of the Confederate submarine Hunley and the retrieval of the USS Monitor's rotating turret interest has flared anew in the little known naval history of America's Civil War. With its actions often blurred by the smoke of emotionalism, the North's strangling blockade of Southern port cities remains a complex saga seldom fully explored or clearly understood by today's generations. Much of this ambiguity is understandably due to the absence of clearcut Union objectives and directives. Thankfully, noted Civil War scholar Robert M. Browning succeeds in clarifying many of these longstanding misconceptions.

During the Civil War, the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, a division of the Union Navy was involved in every military campaign along the Southern coast from South Carolina to northern Florida. Established in 1861, and charged with halting Confederate maritime commerce and closing Southern ports, the Squadron and its operations were essential to the North's success, yet the Union leadership never promoted a strategy that would succeed. Historian Robert Browning, the world's leading scholar of Union naval blockades, scrutinizes the military activities along the South Atlantic seaboard from the perspective of the Union Navy in Success Is All That Was Expected: The South Atlantic Blockading Squadron during the Civil War.

Success Is all That Was Expected is a comprehensive operational history of the Union naval blockade that monitored the southern Atlantic coast from South Carolina to Florida during the American Civil War. This story covers the harrowing engagements between ships and forts, daring amphibious assaults, the battles between ironclad vessels, the harassment of Confederate blockade runners, and the incredible evolution of underwater warfare in the form of the CSS Hunley. …

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