Law Review Digests-Universities & Other Institutions of Higher Learning

Journal of Law and Education, April 2003 | Go to article overview

Law Review Digests-Universities & Other Institutions of Higher Learning


Articles

Lee Bollinger, Seven Myths About Affirmative Action in Universities, 38 WILLAMETTE L. REV. 535 (2002). The author succinctly outlines the myths that underlie arguments against affirmative action and asks the essential question: Is our nation still committed to the role of education in integration?

Eugene H. Bramhall & Ronald Z. Ahrens, Academic Freedom and the Status of Religiously Affiliated University, 37 GONZ. L. REV. 227 (2002). The thesis of this article is that institutions may reasonably limit academic freedom and still be considered legitimate universities. It first identifies the chief characteristics that have historically established an institution's status as a university. Second, the authors argue that no university has limitless academic freedom. Lastly, the authors explain the philosophical justifications for academic freedom and show that those justifications support the right of a religious institution to limit academic freedom while claiming university status.

Notes & Comments

Disparate Treatment of Students in a Similar Class: The Constitutionality of Kentucky's Method of Determining Residency Status for Admissions and Tuition Assessment Purposes, 40 BRANDEIS L.J. 1037 (2002). This note traces the history of law relevant to residency status. The note focuses on the standard of review used by the United States Supreme Court in analyzing residency requirement issues. The note concludes by determining that Kentucky's rule used in determining university students' residency status, Title 13, Section 2:045 of the Kentucky Administration Regulations would most likely, if challenged, be deemed an unconstitutional method of determining a student's status.

The New Star Chamber: An Illusion of Due Process Standards at Private University Disciplinary Hearings, 35 SUFFOLK U.L. REV 169 (2001). The author discusses how private universities often do not offer students due process during disciplinary proceedings and criticizes courts that have applied a traditional contract analysis, despite students' lack of bargaining power when they commit to these contracts.

Reevaluating Amateurism Standards in Men's College Basketball, 35 U. MICH. J.L. REFORM 861 (2002). This note argues that courts should interpret NCAA conduct under the Principle of Amateurism as a violation of Section 1 of the Sherman Antitrust Act, and that courts should order NCAA deregulation of student athletes' indirect financial activities. It begins with a discussion of the history of NCAA regulations, and specifically its Principle of Amateurism. The author argues that the NCAA regulations violate antitrust laws because the Principle of Amateurism's overall effect is to discourage competition. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Law Review Digests-Universities & Other Institutions of Higher Learning
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.