Frederick Delius: Music, Art and Literature

By Matthew-Walker, Robert | Musical Opinion, Summer 1998 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Frederick Delius: Music, Art and Literature


Matthew-Walker, Robert, Musical Opinion


FREDERICK DELIUS: Music, Art and Literature

Edited by Lionel Carley

Ashgate Publishing 336pp + 16 biw and 35 in-text illustrations

ISBN 185928 222 9 55

A characteristic of Symposia is that contributions are rarely all of the same standard, but it has to be said at once that in this volume Lionel Carley has gathered together an outstanding group of contributors, each of whom in their various ways illuminates aspects of Delius: his music; his impact on a wide circle of friends, both close and not so close; their impact on him; and his relationship to fellow-artists in various fields.

The contributions never fall below an interesting standard, and more often than not are of far greater significance than that. In particular, Lionel Carley's own typically thorough yet eminently readable essay on the performance and history of Delius's Incidental Music for Gunnar Heiberg's play Folkeraadet, an important, seminal, yet little-known score, fills an important gap in Delius studies - but the same could be said for all of these essays in one way or another. With no fewer than 13 contributors, it perhaps would be invidious to mention them all, yet each deserves praise for the dedication, enthusiasm and insight they have brought to their chosen subjects, and the admirable if naturally varied literary style they have employed in bringing their discoveries to our attention.

If at first we might wonder how Delius's three appearances as a conductor of his own orchestral music might merit a 21-page essay, or consider that an essay of similar length on the Delius Festival in Jacksonville might all too easily become a listing of events, or consider how the impact of Danish literature was of significance to the composer, we are quickly disabused of such thoughts.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Frederick Delius: Music, Art and Literature
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?