Spillover between Marital Quality and Job Satisfaction: Long-Term Patterns and Gender Differences

By Rogers, Stacy J.; May, Dee C. | Journal of Marriage and Family, May 2003 | Go to article overview

Spillover between Marital Quality and Job Satisfaction: Long-Term Patterns and Gender Differences


Rogers, Stacy J., May, Dee C., Journal of Marriage and Family


We used data from a 12-year panel survey of a nationally representative sample of married individuals (not couples) and structural equation modeling to investigate the process of spillover between marital quality (satisfaction and discord) and job satisfaction among married individuals. We considered three questions: whether job satisfaction and marital quality are related over the long term, whether influence flows primarily from work to family or if there is a pattern of mutual effects between job satisfaction and marital quality, and whether job satisfaction and marital quality are related in similar ways for married women and married men over the long term. We found that marital quality and job satisfaction are related over the long term and that marital quality is the more influential of these domains. We found evidence of both positive and negative spillover from marital quality to job satisfaction over the long term. Specifically, increases in marital satisfaction were significantly related to increases in job satisfaction, and increases in marital discord were significantly related to declines in job satisfaction. Finally, our results indicated that these processes operate similarly for married women and married men.

Key Words: gender, job satisfaction, marital quality, negative spillover, positive spillover, work/family.

Work and marital roles are among the most salient of adult life, and married women and men are increasingly likely to share both economic and domestic responsibilities throughout the life course (Moen, 1992; Spain & Bianchi, 1996). Currently, a majority of married mothers with children under age 6 are employed, and employed wives contribute significantly to their families' total income (White & Rogers, 2000). In addition, women, like men, appreciate the personal rewards from paid work and value job advancement (Hodson, 1996; Moen). With respect to marriage, although marriage rates have declined in recent decades, the great majority of men and women continue to marry (Cherlin, 1992). And although rates of divorce continue to be historically high, remarriage after divorce continues to occur for most women and men (Teachman, Tedrow, & Crowder, 2000), suggesting that people place a high value on marriage.

In this social context of strong commitment to employment and high marital instability, it is particularly important to understand the patterns of influence between work roles and marital roles. Previous research in the work and family tradition has indicated the importance of spillover of positive and negative psychological states from one role into the other (Greenhaus & Beutell, 1985; Piotrkowski, 1979; Voydanoff, 1988). Experiences in one role that leave the individual feeling frustrated, depressed, or ineffective may lead to negative spillover into the other role, contributing to withdrawal or hostility in interaction, dissatisfaction with the role, or lowered role performance. Similarly, experiences in one role that contribute to feelings of competence, enjoyment, and stimulation are associated with positive spillover into the other role, contributing to greater warmth and involvement in interaction, role satisfaction, or improved role performance.

Although the notion of spillover between work and marital relations has considerable empirical support, there are some important gaps in our understanding. First, we know relatively little about spillover between work and marital relations over the long term because much previous research has been cross-sectional (Duxbury, Higgins, & Lee, 1994; Eagle, Miles, & Icenogle, 1997; Frone, Yardley, & Markel, 1997; Hughes, Galinsky, & Morris, 1992), or has focused on variation in work and family over short periods of time such as days or weeks (Bolger, DeLongis, Kessler, & Wethington, 1989; MacEwen & Barling, 1994; Repetti, 1989). However, it is important to consider long-term patterns that may represent the accumulation of short-term effects (Bradbury, Fincham, & Beach, 2000). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Spillover between Marital Quality and Job Satisfaction: Long-Term Patterns and Gender Differences
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.