Independent Report

Independent Banker, October 1998 | Go to article overview

Independent Report


STUDENT CITES COMMUNITY BANK'S LOCAL IMPORTANCE

When high school senior Kimberly Sturgess decided to write an essay about community banking, her own hometown bank in Hankinson, N.D., came to mind. She mentioned Lincoln State Bank's involvement in establishing a local community center, supporting the local fire department and recruiting new businesses to Hankinson.

"From donations to volunteer work, these [community] banks help improve not only their community, but others as well," she wrote.

Sturgess wrote the winning essay in a $200 scholarship contest sponsored by Lincoln State Bank. The annual contest honors the memory of Fred Healy, who served as the bank's president from its opening in 1935 until 1985.

"America's independent banks contribute to every aspect of development in communities," Sturgess wrote. "This requires a very dependable, qualified and charitable establishment, and that's exactly what they are."

GEORGIA BANK WINS TOP HONORS AT HOLIDAY PARADE

Staffers at Independent Bank and Trust Co. in Powder Springs, Ga., entered a float in this summer's Annual City of Marietta (Ga.) Freedom Parade and took home the grand prize.

Independent Bank's float was built as a replica of the local Historic Lost Mountain Store, the bank's first branch. Twenty-one guns were placed around the outside of the float, each with an American flag waving on a pole placed inside the gun barrels. The bank's float was selected as most outstanding float sponsored by a commercial institution.

"The message we wanted to send was simple-being independent is fun!" said James H. Powell, president and CEO of Independent Bank. "We are probably most known by our Lost Mountain office, so it seemed logical to include it on our float."

CALIFORNIA BANKER RECEIVES TOP DISTINCTION

Candace Wiest, president and chief operating officer of Inland Empire National Bank in Riverside, Calif., has been placed on several exclusive lists lately.

In July, Wiest was named one of her region's "top 50 women of distinction" by Financial Advertising Review, a national publication. In May, Inland Empire magazine, a publication that covers five California cities with a total population of nearly two million, named her "one of 12 women who make a difference."

Wiest devotes a lot of time helping local nonprofit groups make her community a better place to live and work. She played an integral role in raising more than $3 million for the local United Way chapter. She also serves on the board of Mission Inn Foundation, a nonprofit organization that maintains and preserves an historic hotel in Riverside. She also stays busy serving the local MakeA-Wish Foundation, a hospital foundation, and a number of other local civic and business organizations.

"I think you have a lot of people committed to making Riverside a better place for all who live here," Wiest told the Inland Empire. "My future is tied to this community. If I'm not Riverside, I don't know who is."

NEW JERSEY CELEBRATES RENOVATION WITH CUSTOMER SWEEPSTAKES

Interchange Bank in Saddle Brook, N.J., celebrated the completion of renovations to its Washington Township branch with a Home Improvement Sweepstakes campaign, which included drawings for $100 and $250 gift certificates for home decoration and hardware supplies.

The campaign was a way to thank the bank's customers for their loyalty during the extensive renovation. "We appreciate their patience during the renovation period, but we think they will find the wait well worth it," said Anthony S. Abbate, president and CEO.

PROMOTIONS, NEW HIRES AND APPOINTMENTS

East

Delaware National Bank in Georgetown, Del., elected three new directors-Amy A. Higgins, who works in marketing for a publishing company; Greg N. Johnson, an insurance agent; and Dr. Vincent B. Killeen, an obstetrician.

First Washington State Bank in Windsor, N. …

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