Brent Scowcroft to Receive Marshall Medal

Army, June 2003 | Go to article overview

Brent Scowcroft to Receive Marshall Medal


The Association of the U.S. Army has selected Lt. Gen. Brent Scowcroft, U.S. Air Force retired, to receive this year's George Catlett Marshall Medal, the association's highest honor. It will be presented at the George Catlett Marshall Dinner at AUSA's Annual Meeting in October.

The retired Air Force general and national security advisor to two presidents was selected for the award for his quiet yet passionate defense of American interests and his unending contributions to the nation.

As the National security Advisor for the Ford Administration, Gen. Scowcroft succeeded Dr. Henry Kissinger, who had been serving as both Advisor and Secretary of State. He served again as National Security Advisor to President George H. Bush, advising the President on events through the end of the Cold War, the collapse of the Soviet Union and the Persian Gulf War. During his tenure with President Bush he was awarded the National Medal of Freedom in 1991 and, two years later, was made an honorary knight of the British Empire.

Gen. Scowcroft was born in Ogden, Utah. After graduating from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in 1947, he received his commission in the Army Air Corps. He graduated from pilot training in October 1948 and served in a number of administrative positions until 1953 when he began teaching Russian history as an assistant professor at West Point. In 1957 he entered the Strategic Intelligence School in Washington, D.C.

In 1959 Gen. Scowcroft became the assistant air attache in the American Embassy in Belgrade, Yugoslavia, where he served for two years. He returned to the United States to attend the Armed Forces Staff College before transferring to the U.S. Air Force Academy where he taught and served as acting head of the Political Science Department. In 1964 he was assigned to the Long Range Planning Division, Directorate of Doctrine, Concepts and Objectives at the Air Force Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, Plans and Operations.

After attending the National War College in 1966, Gen. Scowcroft served in the Western Hemisphere Region of the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs. In 1969 he became the deputy assistant for national security matters in the Air Force's Directorate of Plans.

He first served in the White House as military assistant to President Richard M. Nixon in 1.972, with reassignment the next year as deputy assistant to the President for national security affairs. Between his service with the Ford and Bush administrations, he was the vice chairman of Kissinger Associates, an international consulting firm. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Brent Scowcroft to Receive Marshall Medal
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.