Richard Ebeling Named President of FEE

Ideas on Liberty, June 2003 | Go to article overview

Richard Ebeling Named President of FEE


Professor Richard M. Ebeling, Ph.D., chairman of the department of economics and business administration at Hillsdale College, is the new president of the Foundation for Economic Education.

Ebeling, 53, has been the Ludwig von Mises Professor of Economies at Hillsdale in Michigan since 1988. He has also been vice president of academic affairs for the Future of Freedom Foundation in Fairfax, Va.

A long-time and prolific scholar of liberty, Ebeling's list of academic and popular publications runs 35 pages. He is universally recognized as the premier scholar of the life and works of Ludwig von Mises (1881-1973), a major architect of the Austrian school of economics and adviser to FEE and its founding president, Leonard E. Read. After discovering tens of thousands of pages of Mises's papers in Moscow in 1996 (they had earlier been confiscated by the Nazis), Ebeling edited the three-volume Selected Writings of Ludwig von Mises, two of which have already been published by the Liberty Fund in Indianapolis.

Ebeling has also edited and contributed to many other books, including Disaster in Red: The Failure and Collapse of Socialism, published by FEE. …

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Richard Ebeling Named President of FEE
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