The Development of Identity and Pride in the Indian Child

By Horne, Esther Burnett | Multicultural Education, Summer 2003 | Go to article overview

The Development of Identity and Pride in the Indian Child


Horne, Esther Burnett, Multicultural Education


Esther Burnett Horne (1909-1999) was an inspiration to many whose lives she touched. A great-great-granddaughter of Sacajawea, the young Shoshone woman who accompanied Lewis and Clark on their expedition across the northwestern United States in 1805, Horne became well known in her own right for her contributions and commitment to the education of American Indians. When she was fourteen years old, Horne began attending Haskell Institute in Lawrence, Kansas, a Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) boarding school. She completed her teacher education with the Normal Training Department at Haskell Institute and was recruited to teach in BIA schools. She taught for a year at the Eufaula Creek Girls Boarding School in Oklahoma and then began a thirty-five year career at the Wahpeton Indian School in Wahpeton, North Dakota.

Horne became a demonstration teacher for BIA summer inservice workshops. While at Wahpeton Indian School, she established the first Indian girl scout troop in the United States. In 1960, she was a delegate to the White House Conference on Children and Youth. A master teacher who was loved by her students and colleagues, Horne received the Distinguished Service Citation from the Bureau of Indian Affairs in 1966. After her retirement in 1965, Horne continued her involvement in education. She consulted for schools and colleges across the country and abroad, gave many presentations to groups of students and teachers, and became an advocate for the educational concerns of American Indian people.

Those interested in learning more about Esther Burnett Horne are referred to her life history, Essie's Story: The Life and Legacy of a Shoshone Teacher, published in 1998 by the University of Nebraska Press. The writing of her life history was a ten-year collaborative project with Sally McBeth, an anthropologist at the University of Northern Colorado.

The following paper was originally written by Home in the late 1960s when she presented and distributed the paper to teachers during inservice workshops. Home felt that even though her paper was written in the 1960s, many of the points she wanted to make at that time are still relevant and many of the issues she addressed are not yet resolved. She hoped that in the near future all educators would have knowledge of American Indian cultures and would understand and know how to address educational concerns of American Indian youth, their families, and communities.

-Cynthia B. Leung

Introduction

What I want so desperately to share with you is not taken from books or the experiences of others. It might be termed an overview of my life: as a student in public and BIA schools, as a dedicated teacher in the Bureau of Indian Affairs, as a demonstration teacher in a public school embracing both non-Indian and Indian students, as a mother of two Indian children who were the first Indian students in an elementary school in the area where we lived, and as a consultant to teachers and students in schools, colleges, and youth groups.

Identity and pride are the criteria for success. An individual without identity is like a plant devoid of nourishment. It withers and dies. Possessing identity, we feel a sense of freedom from within. I have known personal frustrations and heartbreak as an Indian child in an alien world with apathetic discriminatory adults and peers, both in public and BIA schools. But also in these same spheres I have experienced thrills and heart glow in the challenging atmospheres of the people who cared. They seemed aware of the things we did not say.

There were many employees who were humanitarian personalities at Haskell Institute, a manual labor school I attended in the 1920s where the prime aim was to take the Indianness out of the Indian. They were not afraid to fail by trying new techniques. They did a tremendous job of selling me my future. My elders had the strength of their convictions about our heritage and Indian values. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Development of Identity and Pride in the Indian Child
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.